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> What's Required To Make A Show Horse ?
Hoogie
post Dec 4 2005, 10:23 PM
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QUOTE (Meryl @ Dec 4 2005, 12:39 AM)
QUOTE (Guest @ Dec 2 2005, 06:19 AM)
Do you honestly think a horse pulled from the paddock in poor to fair condition deserves to win.

Yes I DO believe such a horse should win - a BREEDING class. Now if we were judging the best conditioned horse, then they should have their own class. But if we want to select the best Arabian horse who has the best conformation, the best type, then this is a breeding class. The winner is the one who should have the best traits to pass down to future generations. Now if conditioning is passed on to their foals, then how well a horse is brushed should be the winner.

We had this happen at a recent show - almost all of the horses there were presented beautifully by both amateur and professional alike... apart from two which looked as though they had been dragged out of the paddock the day before. Both of the horses had nice type, fairly good conformation and movement, but they simply looked "yuck" compared with the other horses. It was an outdoors show in lovely sunshine yet the horse's coats didn't shine. I am not saying they needed to be clipped and done up to the nines, but some consistant brushing a few weeks before the show, and some hard feed, and a drench, would have made them appear more healthy.
Remember, a judge only has a few seconds to look at each horse - and like it or not, first impressions last.
In theory I agree with you - conditioning and training shouldn't win a class, but the fact is, it does! That's why we have have to take show wins with a grain of salt, and not use them as a measure of a suitable breeding prospect. If I want to choose a breeding animal , I would prefer to see it and it's family members at home in it's natural environment.
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Cheryl L
post Dec 4 2005, 10:30 PM
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How true! At our first show in 2005, Shamal was pretty much taken out of the pasture and received 2nd place and that was all the further he went. He was beaten by a horse that should not have beaten him ever. His son went on to take champion. Shamal had been getting turned out in a small paddock (recovering from a suspensory ligament injury, an old one received at the quarantine facility in Canada). That's why when this thread was started, I thought I would put my 2 cents worth in and try to get people out there to show and give them some tools to start with. It is not hard, it just takes some time and consistency. I did it all on my own......... and if I can do it, anyone can do it. I have laid out an easy program to follow. If you are against the whole "training and conditioning concept" just tell your self that you are just spending some time with your horse in a structured way. I like to call it playing halter, makes it seem like less of a chore. Also just to let people know, I work 9-10 hours a day and when I started training Shamal it was in the winter, outside in the dark, under a mercury light. He was 8 months old and I had just gotten him, it was a great bonding experience. My goal is Nationals, down the road. This year is back to Class A (2006) and Regionals next year (2007). Cheryl
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JMO
post Dec 5 2005, 12:11 AM
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Thank you for all the points of view being discussed here. Like Robert said one would not go out to dinner with out trying to look ones best . Hoogie you raise a vaid point in how first impressions count . I think with that in mind we do at times blame too much on the poor judge. Just think about it for a moment, when we are seated at ring side we get to have a hard long look at every horse when it passes by. Now I don't know about you but the stand out winner is very easy to pick when he first steps into the ring and I will admit that presentation and conditiong plays a big part . Now with this in mind I can understand why to present a horse to it's best can make the job appear easy but it is when you present to the judge and they have as best a look as they can with the time expected of them, can their dissision change from one horse to another ,and if you were to present your horse in the best possible way you know how, then I guess you would some what level the playing field. @ Cheryl I with others thank you for your imput ,it appears other exibitors wish to keep their secrets. Do you have a solution to a horse who will not drink away from home hence " tucks up '' and throws all your hard work out of the window.
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Cheryl L
post Dec 5 2005, 12:21 AM
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I will give you a Tom McNair tip....Take as much kosher salt in your hand as possible and just rub it into your horse lips and teeth and mouth, trying to get as much in as possible, your horse will drink within an hour. This worked very well with a friends horse who could be picky about the water. Cheryl
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JMO
post Dec 5 2005, 12:34 AM
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Thank you for that. What about teaching a young horse to trot on the lead for the first time ? What tips do you have to keep him in a straight line and at your side instead of dragging him along ?
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Cheryl L
post Dec 5 2005, 12:47 AM
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Good question! I forgot to cover that. Simply carry your halter whip in your left hand,reach behind you, tap the hind end and cluck at the same time. You will get a startled response the first time, but they will move forward and praise them. It doesn't take long before they get the idea, cluck and trot. When you get the cluck and trot down, you can work on straightness. That is just a lot of trotting in hand. You can also use a fence or ditch on the horses right side. I know that I repeat this alot but don't forget to praise them. Our Arabs are so smart, and they want to please you. They know when they get cheated out of a good boy/girl. The reason that I don't like to treat in the ring.......some horses really expect that treat and will start to creep forward or worse yet, they twist their heads sideways and do weird(they think it's cute) things with their lips. Feel free to ask as many questions as you like. I am more than happy to share what I know. When I get a scanner I will print pictures of my horse, his son and me. Take Care, Cheryl
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HartzArabians
post Dec 6 2005, 10:47 PM
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To be honest my first thought in response to your question was... money!!

Sadly in most cases today the horses winning do not IMO have the type or conformation to win in breeding classes but they do because they are always conditioned amazingly and unfortunately alot of us dont have the money to either send out our horses to be conditioned or the time to do it ourselves.
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Robert 1
post Dec 6 2005, 11:24 PM
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Hi to all,

I understand it cost a lot to have a horse at the trainers and then to have the trainer show the horse for you.
We thought that was the way to go and so we used some top trainers in the past, but we quickly stopped doing that for several reasons. wink.gif
Please let me try to tell some of the reasons we stopped using a professional trainer.
The main reason was we lost all the enjoyment of being in the show ring with a horse that we bred and raised.
Afterall we spent a lot of time making the foal happen to begin with as we are breeders and thus we develope and bred all of our horses that we take to the shows. wink.gif
We never felt comfortable having our horse at someone elses training center and not being looked in by us and seeing that there needs were met and just plain enjoying them, can't seem to enjoy a horse when they aren't there. wink.gif
So basically without going on and on, my point is why do all the work and then when it comes time for the enjoyment, give it to someone else and pay a lot of money on top of this. huh.gif
I know a lot of people will say I can't take and show any horse because, of what ever good reason and I understand that but, when you have some ability, why not go for it, and this is happening because each time I go to the Egyptian Event we see more and more new people in the ring showing there own horses and I commend them with much praise. biggrin.gif
Robert,
EHAP
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Cheryl L
post Oct 3 2006, 09:48 PM
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This is being bumped up for Dave.
They are easy steps and anybody can do it. Good luck and if you have any questions just ask.
Cheryl
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Kat
post Oct 3 2006, 10:54 PM
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St. Clair's Mena Mareeka, never showen, pulled out
of the pasture, brushed up a little, and took 3rd at
the EE in a big class. I think she was 8 to ten years
old, one of thoughs mares that is hard to forget smile.gif
I don't think the spelling is right she was a Bint Deena
daughter.
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Cheryl L
post Oct 3 2006, 11:01 PM
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I remember that Kat!
Also Imtaarif was pulled out of the pasture and no bridle path and won Supreme Champion at the EE. They just "knocked the dirt off of him" so to speak.
Cheryl
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Liz Allen
post Oct 4 2006, 03:45 AM
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smile.gif
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Guest_Guest_*
post Oct 4 2006, 08:45 AM
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Excellent thread, love it and learnt a lot already!

I have a colt foal who is a real little mover, nice bloodlines, good conformation. When he is loose in the field he is strutting his stuff, delighting in his own movement and has his tail vertical. I have only done a little lead work with him so far, and only in walk.

What is the best way to chanel and direct this liberty trot into an in-hand trot with the same puff and snort as I see in the field? When we walk out he is very calm and takes much interest in looking around him but none of the fire I see when in the paddock...

Also, he is starting to nip. I push his head away and say 'no!' but he likes this game. If I push his whole body, he whips round and threatens to kick me! Any ideas? Off topic, but could do with a few pointers on this as well if possible.
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Guest_Guest_*
post Oct 4 2006, 09:28 AM
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QUOTE (Guest @ Oct 4 2006, 09:45 AM)
Excellent thread, love it and learnt a lot already!

I have a colt foal who is a real little mover, nice bloodlines, good conformation.  When he is loose in the field he is strutting his stuff, delighting in his own movement and has his tail vertical.  I have only done a little lead work with him so far, and only in walk.

What is the best way to chanel and direct this liberty trot into an in-hand trot with the same puff and snort as I see in the field?  When we walk out he is very calm and takes much interest in looking around him but none of the fire I see when in the paddock...

Also, he is starting to nip.  I push his head away and say 'no!' but he likes this game.  If I push his whole body, he whips round and threatens to kick me!  Any ideas?  Off topic, but could do with a few pointers on this as well if possible.
*


mine does that too sometimes, but he's starting to learn that nipping isn't ok. When he nips, I take a little piece of skin between my fingers and twist it around, kinda has the same effect as when any of the adult horses would give him a bite when he does anything to annoy them...
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Cheryl L
post Oct 4 2006, 11:47 AM
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To trot in hand: Just take your horse jogging. Go at least 50 feet in a straight line. If you do not have a fence line, use the driveway or the side of the road with a ditch. Don't worry about blow and snort. Right now you need control. The first time you hit the ring, you will have all the snort and blow that you want. When the horse is playing in the pasture, Tell him good boy and pretty. When I play with the horses in the pasture, I use a plastic grocery bag on the end of the lunge whip. I tell them how pretty and good they look. When I am done, I raise my hand and say Ok good boys come on. I have and apple or carrots to share. They are not afraid of the whip and come in to get their treat. When you have got your horse trotting steadily with you, you can put a bag on your halter whip. The biggest thing is praise.
Nipping horses, colts. I will smack them and yell very loudly. I have never had a head shy horse. You need to watch the eyes they will get a hard look to them, that will precipitate nipping. Another horse would kick them for nipping and you cannot ever hit a horse that hard. If they are truly persistent, I put the halter whip between me and the horse and give them a little corrective sting. Note I said sting, NOT beating. I do not condone abuse.
Cheryl
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