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> Grass-and Forrest Fire In Us
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post Dec 30 2005, 08:56 AM
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Saw a report this morning from Oklahoma/Texas a grass fire and 2 horses escaping in front of it. Looked like arabian mares. A short sequence only, but obviosly it is a catastrofy going on there. Someone who knows?
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HLM
post Dec 31 2005, 04:37 PM
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Yes it is pretty bad. Thousands of acres burned, hundreds of houses too and some people died.

That area is saturated with livestock, cattle, horses, etc.etc. Grassfire spreads fast. Those farm lands are huge.Here in Florida we set fire to old fields, the grass is not that high, dig a trench around it to keep it from spredding and a few months later you see lushious green grass. Just about all fields here are always cut down, as the horses can not eat long grass- cant bite it off as cattle can using their tongue. Horses teeth are like a vice, not like those of dogs or other mammals. This is why you often see them chewing off the half inch areas and leave the other alone.

Ones the fire runs, you cant stop it. It runs faster than we can. If the areas are not kept tidy and clean the fire has a field day. One way they did it here on brush fires is to light a fire on the other end so that the fire runs into the other one and puts itself out.

I just hope that farmers opened the gates to their fences, so that the animals can get out and often away. Good idea is, if you have this problem keep a halter with the horses name and Registration number on it. this way it can be identified easily. We did this here during the hurrican. Did it also for our dogs.

IN any case it is horrible and my heart goes out to all those enduring this horrendous tragedy, praying that they will survive.

Hansi biggrin.gif
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majestik1
post Dec 31 2005, 07:51 PM
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QUOTE (HLM @ Dec 31 2005, 05:37 PM)
Yes it is pretty bad. Thousands of acres burned, hundreds of houses too and some people died.

That area is saturated with livestock, cattle, horses, etc.etc. Grassfire spreads fast. Those farm lands are huge.Here in Florida we set fire to old fields, the grass is not that high, dig a trench around it to keep it from spredding and a few months later you see lushious green grass. Just about all fields here are always cut down, as the horses can not eat long grass- cant bite it off as cattle can using their tongue. Horses teeth are like a vice, not like those of dogs or other mammals. This is why you often see them chewing off the half inch areas and leave the other alone.

Ones the fire runs, you cant stop it. It runs faster than we can. If the areas are not kept tidy and clean the fire has a field day. One way they did it here on brush fires is to light a fire on the other end so that the fire runs into the other one and puts itself out.

I just hope that farmers opened the gates to their fences, so that the animals can get out and often away. Good idea is, if you have this problem keep a halter with the horses name and Registration number on it. this way it can be identified easily. We did this here during the hurrican. Did it also for our dogs.

IN any case it is horrible and my heart goes out to all those enduring this horrendous tragedy, praying that they will survive.

Hansi biggrin.gif
Serenity Arabian Farms
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let's offer prayer for the new year for all creatures human or or other that are affected by this horrible situation.
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larapintavian
post Dec 31 2005, 09:27 PM
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Yes, it's tinder box dry here ..... we're just southwest of Okalhoma City.....we're over 11 inches below normal precipitation. The winds were so high two days ago that the embers from the fires were being carried up to 1/4 mile before starting new fires in grass, leaves, scrub oak (which holds its dry leaves), or the explosive native red cedar trees. Fires have even been started by the winds rubbing electrical wires together and producing a spark.

We have had only 1 fire here on the west side and that was quite a few miles north of us. Most of the fires have been on the NE side of the city, or in other parts of the state. The small town of Seminole (east of OKC) had major fires for three days in a row, burning hundreds of acres and outbuildings and over 50 homes. Generally, the goal is to save homes and livestock and stop the fires at the section lines (1 mile intervals). Barns and outbuildings are not a priority and many have been destroyed.

My daughter, Chrissi, is an Oklahoma County Deputy Sheriff, K9 Patrol Division. She has had fires in her patrol area north of the city, but usually she is not called to them because of the smoke's possible effects on her dog. However, she was eventually called on the big one two days ago as she's often called in situations involving livestock.. Three horses had already been lost, closed in a barn at a Quarter Horse "training facility" .... no one home and no one knew the horses were locked in. When Chris arrived, there were 11 other horses trapped in a burning pasture, no way out except onto a busy road with emergency vehicles flying by, no halters, no lead ropes ..... you get the dismal picture. Chris and the others eventually moved the horses to an area with little grass and fire, and then literally chased them over the low fire line by waving anything they could find at them. Even with 11 frightened , loose, horses there were enough people to keep them going the right direction away from the higher flames. They made it out, over the low fire and on to another enclosure, with NO injuries, shortly before the rest of the field totally errupted. The horses were a bit shook up, but all safe. People were a bit shook up too.

The next day Chris put several halters, lead ropes, and a lunge whip in her cruiser with her dog. They'll stay there in case they're needed again.

Today the fire alert is in the "severe" category, but so far only one reported fire in the OKC area. Tomorrow with very unseasonably warm temps (75 expected), winds predicted to gust to 50 mph, and humidity below 20%, the fire danger will excalate to the "critical" category .... same predicted for Tuesday. The entire state has been under a burning ban for almost 7 weeks, but people still persist in ignoring it. The governor has promised sever retribution for anyone igniting fireworks to celebrate tonight.

Our place has 750' of Interstate Highway frontage, so tossed cigarettes are a concern, but we also have 2 large dry paddocks on that side as well as a plowed field (our now totally dried out and failed winter wheat pasture) that would stop flames.
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majestik1
post Dec 31 2005, 09:33 PM
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QUOTE (larapintavian @ Dec 31 2005, 10:27 PM)
Yes, it's tinder box dry here ..... we're just southwest of Okalhoma City.....we're over 11 inches below normal precipitation.  The winds were so high two days ago that the embers from the fires were being carried up to 1/4 mile before starting new fires in grass, leaves, scrub oak (which holds its dry leaves), or the explosive native red cedar trees. Fires have even been started by the winds rubbing electrical wires together and producing a spark.

We have had only 1 fire here on the west side and that was quite a few miles north of us.  Most of the fires have been on the NE side of the city, or in other parts of the state.  The small town of Seminole (east of OKC)  had major fires for three days in a row, burning hundreds of acres and outbuildings and over 50 homes. Generally, the goal is to save homes and livestock and stop the fires at the section lines (1 mile intervals).  Barns and outbuildings are not a priority and many have been destroyed.

My daughter, Chrissi, is an Oklahoma County Deputy Sheriff, K9 Patrol Division.  She has had fires in her patrol area north of the city, but usually she is not called to them because of the smoke's possible effects on her dog.  However, she was eventually called on the big one two days ago as she's often called in situations involving livestock..  Three horses had already been lost, closed in a barn at a Quarter Horse "training facility" .... no one home and no one knew the horses were locked in.  When Chris arrived, there were 11 other horses trapped in a burning pasture, no way out except onto a busy road with emergency vehicles flying by, no halters, no lead ropes ..... you get the dismal picture.  Chris and the others eventually moved  the horses to an area with little grass and fire, and then literally chased them over the low fire line by waving anything they could find at them.  Even with 11 frightened , loose, horses there were  enough people to keep them going the right direction away from the higher flames.  They made it out, over the low fire and on to another enclosure, with NO injuries, shortly before the rest of the field totally errupted.  The horses were a bit shook up, but all safe.  People were a bit shook up too.

The next day Chris put several halters, lead ropes, and a lunge whip in her cruiser with her dog.  They'll stay there in case they're needed again. 

Today the fire alert is in the "severe" category, but so far only one reported fire in the OKC area.  Tomorrow with very unseasonably warm temps (75 expected) and winds predicted to gust to 50 mph, the fire danger will excalate to the "critical" category .... same predicted for Tuesday.  The entire state has been under a burning ban for almost 7 weeks, but people still persist in ignoring it.  The governor has promised sever retribution for anyone igniting fireworks to celebrate tonight. 

Our place has 750' of Interstate Highway frontage, so tossed cigarettes are a concern, but we also have 2 large dry paddocks on that side as well as a plowed field (our now totally dried out and failed winter wheat pasture) that would stop flames.
*



well i can understand that.... pick life or out buildings .....t's sort of comforting in a weird way, to know their priorities are saving lives .... outbuildings can eventually be replaced lives cannot so please stay safe and my prayers are with everyone affected by this and other disasters. hugs BARB
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HLM
post Jan 1 2006, 02:07 PM
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Goodmorning to all and happy New Year again

thanks for the report, it sounds terrible. Floods are bad but I think fire is worse. Is there anything we can do to help?

Why would anybody lock a barn? Insurance companies here would never pay, if barns are locked so that horses cant get out. How can one get in to help, eh?

We found that horses are safer outside in any kind of disaster. they instinctively act. Usually one is notified of what is coming and can put halters on the horses. It only costs a few dollars to put a name tag on a horse or dog. But it will save lives.

My heart goes out to all and if there is anything we can do, send, or whatever, please let us know. We have so many old halters, dont look pretty anymore, but do a job.

Have a wonderful new year and all the best.

Hansi biggrin.gif
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larapintavian
post Jan 1 2006, 02:41 PM
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QUOTE (HLM @ Jan 1 2006, 03:07 PM)
Floods are bad but I think fire is worse.
Isn't it ironic .... Parts of California are almost drowning, and the water stops at the mountains never reaching the south central areas of the country that really need it. One weather forecaster today stated that IF we did get a huge raifall we would actually flood because the dry clay based soil wouldn't absorb the water fast enough .... so, while we desperately need moisture, it needs to be nice, slow, gentle rainfall.

QUOTE
Why would anybody lock a barn? Insurance companies here would never pay, if barns are locked so that horses cant get out. How can one get in to help, eh?
My error, 'locked' was the improper word .. should have said closed in. The problem was the fire jumped so fast no one could get to the barn in time to check inside. If someone had been home, they would have known the fire was headed their way and could have gotten the horses out before the fire jumped. Most people around here are keeping track of fire reports at their work and employers are letting them leave if their property is in danger.

QUOTE
We found that horses are safer outside in any kind of disaster. they instinctively act. Usually one is notified of what is coming and can put halters on the horses.
This is one reason ours are outside 24-7 even though we have a 16 stall pole barn. Hansi, Serenity Taruf is outside, his paddock has gates on opposite ends (one to Chrissi's yard, the other to my gravel drive), and halters hanging by both gates.

Chris took Emmersom down to my sister's in southern OK, riding in the big hills for conditioning to get him ready for Eventing at Training level this year. Hopefully he'll do as well as he did at Novice last year, and this year he has Young Event Horse '5' competition (remember, Emmersom won the two YEH '4' competitions he was in last year, over the TBs and WBs). Though Chrissi is gone for two days, her husband and I both stayed home just in case of fire or other problem here or at my neice's place (my neice and her new 1/2 Arab endurance mare went with Chris) They should be back this evening, and in a few days we should see new muscle definition show on their horses from those two days of long slow hill work....funny how that muscle suddenly shows several days later, amazes me every time.

Happy New Year Hansi and Everybody here.
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HLM
post Jan 1 2006, 03:36 PM
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thanks Sharon, this is great

Actually horses can take so much being outside. Ours went through two humengous hurricans and never got a scratch. Never have a cough or a snooty nose either.They conditioned.

Nothing better for horses then to be outside, may be an open shelter somewhere, nothing fancy, just neat and practical. dont need blankets either, ours never get one.

We have sometimes a few hours of frost, then it warms up but also had tempertures int he summer go to 112F. And all are so healthy and so happy, doing what comes natural.

So happy about Taruf. He should come through for you although started late
as a 9-10year old. Got lots of milage left in him- like another 20 years.

Yes, if people only sometimes use their head and think of the animals. I do all the time. Of course those of us who went through a war prepare much better
knowing consequences so well.

Take care and God bless

Hansi biggrin.gif
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