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> Stallion Fencing
fhl_stables
post Jul 20 2007, 12:16 AM
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What do YOU use to contain your stallions?

What works for you ?

What has NOT worked for you?
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JMO
post Jul 20 2007, 01:01 AM
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I feel an absolute must have is an electric fence....it's amzing how much respect a horse will have with it. What fascinates me though is how they test it by getting so close with their whiskers I cringe thinking they are going to get a zap.
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Aimbri
post Jul 20 2007, 01:11 AM
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I don't like electric. Just my own personal preference.

I use metal stallion panels. They are the portable kind that you link together. Only problem is, Sadik AND Mojo take the word "portable" literally, and drag them around. I have curtailed that, somewhat, by tying one end to a post. Just have to straighten them out from time to time.

Jeannette
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zenith
post Jul 20 2007, 02:14 AM
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When I stand bring mares into the equation I'm planning to use an electrobraid type electric fencing. Its really strong (cf normal electric braid or tape fences which a horse can break), much safer than wire fences (and post/rail or panel IMO) and economical.
Presently I use braided electric fences with good results, providing they are energised and maintained correctly. An earth line is really important to use with difficult animals or in dryer weather.
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larapintavian
post Jul 20 2007, 03:23 AM
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Our three stallions are each in different kinds/combinations of fencing.

Two sides Daalim El Nefous' fence is non climb horse wire (our property perimeter fence). The 48 inch fence wire is mounted 1 foot above the ground (keeps horses from walking it down) which makes it 5' high, discouraging his leaning over it. It is also fastend at the top to a strand of barbLESS wire to add strength. the other two sides are 5 foot chain link (deer on one end) with a solid rail on top.

Sunsabi is in the arena. The two sides towards the house and barn are 4 foot chain link (to keep kids and dogs out) mounted about 6 inches above the ground with steel rail on top. Third side is 5 foot chain link (the deer on the other side ... they jump), and the fourth side, adjoining the gelding's paddock, is 4 foot, three strand pipe and cable (pipe rail on top). We do have a bit of problem with Sabi stretching the bottom of the chain link, trying to reach under to the grass on the other side. It really needs a sturdy bottom anchor rail or cable to attach to.

Serenity Taruf's paddock has the three sides adjoining the gelding's paddock made from the heavy duty portable panels (one corner is anchored to a tree, another to a post). The fourth side is 5 strand high tensil electric .... but the electricity is never on because Taruf never tries it and it borders my driveway inside the perimeter fence.

We haven't had the electric up around the boys for a long time. All the mares are across my drive and up a hill away from them. They seem happy with each other for company. 'Sabi' and Taruf each have a special gelding friend that they happily scratch witheres with over the fence. They do show off and greet the girls when we bring the ladies in on nasty winter evenings. All of them are out 24-7 in the summer and most of the winter.
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fhl_stables
post Jul 20 2007, 03:45 AM
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QUOTE (JMO @ Jul 20 2007, 02:01 AM)
I feel an absolute must have is an electric fence....it's amzing how much respect a horse will have with it. What fascinates me though is how they test it by getting so close with their whiskers I cringe thinking they are going to get a zap.
*


I plan to use electric 2" tape - like the electro braid, for containing horses on top of the 2x4" mesh fencing.
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fhl_stables
post Jul 20 2007, 03:46 AM
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QUOTE (Aimbri @ Jul 20 2007, 02:11 AM)
I don't like electric.  Just my own personal preference.

I use metal stallion panels.  They are the portable kind that you link together.  Only problem is, Sadik AND Mojo take the word "portable" literally, and drag them around.  I have curtailed that, somewhat, by tying one end to a post.  Just have to straighten them out from time to time.

Jeannette
*


I've never heard of stallion panels - are they like cattle panels?
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fhl_stables
post Jul 20 2007, 03:52 AM
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QUOTE (zenith @ Jul 20 2007, 03:14 AM)
When I stand bring mares into the equation I'm planning to use an electrobraid type electric fencing.  Its really strong (cf normal electric braid or tape fences which a horse can break), much safer than wire fences (and post/rail or panel IMO) and economical.
Presently I use braided electric fences with good results, providing they are energised and maintained correctly.  An earth line is really important to use with difficult animals or in dryer weather.
*


The electrobraid type is what I like too. It's very sturdy and I like that it comes in different colors.
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fhl_stables
post Jul 20 2007, 03:57 AM
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QUOTE (larapintavian @ Jul 20 2007, 04:23 AM)
Our three stallions are each in different kinds/combinations of fencing. 
*


Guess it's a good thing we have so many good choices for different horses. I know my gelding will test the fence cuz he's ONERY. His buddy, my SE filly, will follow suit b/c they are partners in crime. lol My SE mare will leave the fence - any fence - alone. Not sure on the new rescues what they might do with different fencing. I want to make sure I have GOOD solid fencing for when we DO get a stallion on the premises.

Does anyone use the Red Brand Mesh fencing that is 2 x 4 ? I planned on using that with wooden posts along with a top row of the electric braid. I will probably have to run some of the electric braid at the bottom in some pastures b/c of our pygmy's and ONE dog that thinks digging is SO fun. sad.gif We do pasture rotation so the goats go in the pasture that the horses aren't in.

~ Charity
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Aimbri
post Jul 20 2007, 05:15 AM
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QUOTE (fhl_stables @ Jul 20 2007, 04:46 AM)
I've never heard of stallion panels - are they like cattle panels?
*



The stallion panels are taller (higher) than the cattle panels. More in weight like the heavy duty, but only taller.

Jeannette
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Aimbri
post Jul 20 2007, 05:26 AM
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Here is a photo that shows the stallions panels. This gelding (was a stallion at the time) is over 15hh, and can just get his head over.

Jeannette
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Cheryl L
post Jul 20 2007, 06:59 AM
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Shamal has 4 board fencing, with a strand of breakable woven hot wire on the top and in between each board.. This discourages the surrounding horses from "messing" with the fence also. I am not a fan of high tensil wire, if a horse were to strike or rear, it does not break. It also will come out from the attachment area and spring into where the horses are and they can and will get tangled in it.
Cheryl
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Robert 1
post Jul 20 2007, 02:37 PM
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Hi,
I will agree with Cheryl about not using high tensil, this is a disaster waiting to happen for horses, foals hit it so hard and bounce back getting hurt, grown horses can slid under it on wet or snow covered ground, it must have been designed for cows, that don't run. laugh.gif
There is no fence that works for a stallion and a mare in heat being seperated, because the mare will push and rub her backside on it when in heat, there simply needs to be a seperation of several feet usually a drive lane or another seperate paddock to keep them a few feet away but, not so far as to make them feel isolated, remember the stallion is the calmest when he can be near the mares.
We used four board fencing with a strong live electric wire near the top of the fence and it does receive good respect from the horses and sometimes from people when they lean over the fence laugh.gif if the live wire is placed on the inside several inches down from the top, it makes it more avoidable for people and receives more respect from the horse laugh.gif
Enjoy,
Robert,
Echo Hill Arabians
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fhl_stables
post Jul 20 2007, 03:28 PM
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Ya know I don't think Ive ever seen them! We have the cattle panels and that's about it. Hmmm very interesting! But not good if the stallion himself thinks they are portable. LOL
~Charity
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larapintavian
post Jul 20 2007, 03:32 PM
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One of the biggest necessities we've found over the years, is that with horses the fence needs to be high enough to discourage leaning over or pushing. 5' works for most of the taller horses.

I think our non-climb horse wire may be the same as the 'red' fence you refer to. It's a 2 x 4 mesh also, but is NOT a 'welded' wire mesh. Ours, ounted on wooden posts, has been up about 12 years, but I really think it's longevity is definitely linked to having the top reinforeced, even though the top is 5' high, and having the bottom up off the ground. We do have a few stretched, bowed spots from horses scratching their rear ends on it.

V-mesh is also long lasting, but much more expensinve than the non-climb horse fence. We've also known of young horses to get their teeth caught in the v-mesh (we're in an area near lots of racing QH breeders who use it).

Whether or not a horse runs into a fence has a lot of factors .... visibility being EXTREMELY important .... size of the paddock/pasture being another...location of the paddock .... whether the horse is out 24/7 or turned out sporadically ... all have a bearing on the horse's actions/abilities to avoid a fence 'crash'.....also knowing each individual's response to various situations.

During Chrissi's years as a working student for a former Olympian's Eventing barn as well as her time as assistent trainer at a Grand Prix Jumper barn, she quickly learned that stalled show horses, even those being regularly worked and exercised, are the most likely to have a 'fence crash' when turned out ... they simply get too excited with their 'freedom', and the younger the horse, the more likely the accident. At both barns, they had grooms or working students who supervised the ENTIRE turn out time for the show strings, just incase of an accident. One of these barns had all classic wood fences, the other pipe and cable. Both facilities were impecably maintained, but it was still positively necessary to constantly supervise the show horses during their turnout. Natually, both the above facilities RARELY had an accident, and those very minor, but only because of their close supervision of the show horses.

The Eventing farm also had a small group of broodmares and young stock who were out in good sized pastures 24/7 in summer and most the time in winter. These mares and youngsters did not have any 'fence' collisions, regardless of the fencing materials. 'Course they also weren't bothered by outside influences like helicopters, chasing dogs, motorcycles, etc. which would add another dimension.

In all cases, we've found that horses that have been exposed to a variety of stimuli while growing up (kids, dogs, lawn and building equipment, motorcycles, strange animals and fowl, flapping tarps, even gunfire/fireworks in the company of CALM humans/hoses) are much less prone to 'accidents' or ulcers period. After 40 years, we've had only ONE fairly serious fence collision and that was over 30 years ago involving three weanlings racing around a fairly small paddock. One slipped in a corner only because she was crowded by the others and could not maneuver freely.
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