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> Stallion Fencing
fhl_stables
post Jul 20 2007, 03:36 PM
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QUOTE (Cheryl L @ Jul 20 2007, 07:59 AM)
Shamal has 4 board fencing, with a strand of breakable woven hot wire on the top and in between each board.. This discourages the surrounding horses from "messing" with the fence also. I am not a fan of high tensil wire, if a horse were to strike or rear, it does not break. It also  will come out from the attachment area and spring into where the horses are and they can and will get tangled in it.
Cheryl
*


Yeah I've heard too many horror stories with smooth wire and barbed wire and more. We have some barbed wire on our property but that will be taken down and replaced as soon as we can do it. My horses don't bother that part of the fence (cows on the other side).
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Desert Tag Arabi...
post Jul 20 2007, 04:39 PM
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We have board fencing with a hot wire at the top as well. It has worked wonderfully. The stallion will put his nose between the bottom boards and sniff the mares when in heat, but he can't put his head over the fence because of the hot wire.
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Gabe
post Jul 20 2007, 05:05 PM
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Are you getting a stallion Charity?????? smile.gif
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fhl_stables
post Jul 20 2007, 05:34 PM
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I totally agree with your assessment Lara. Now I've never heard of the V mesh being a problem but I've also noticed where there are horses - there WILL be accidents. It's the reason when we moved, I took mesh fencing and put it along the steel pipe fencing to make it where they wouldn't get their legs through there. I think I'm more paranoid of steel piping and panels then I am of barbed wire! Granted I dont want that either. smile.gif
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fhl_stables
post Jul 20 2007, 05:37 PM
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QUOTE (Desert Tag Arabians @ Jul 20 2007, 05:39 PM)
We have board fencing with a hot wire at the top as well.  It has worked wonderfully.  The stallion will put his nose between the bottom boards and sniff the mares when in heat, but he can't put his head over the fence because of the hot wire.
*


Does the board fencing require a lot of maintenance?
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fhl_stables
post Jul 20 2007, 05:42 PM
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QUOTE (Gabe @ Jul 20 2007, 06:05 PM)
Are you getting a stallion Charity?????? smile.gif
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Welllllllll it's a possibility. wink.gif

We are doing our paddocks and stalls before winter hits so I thought I'd ask b/c I wanna have stallion safe everything - when that time comes.
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phanilah
post Jul 20 2007, 05:43 PM
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QUOTE (fhl_stables @ Jul 20 2007, 06:34 PM)
I totally agree with your assessment Lara. Now I've never heard of the V mesh being a problem but I've also noticed where there are horses - there WILL be accidents. It's the reason when we moved, I took mesh fencing and put it along the steel pipe fencing to make it where they wouldn't get their legs through there. I think I'm more paranoid of steel piping and panels then I am of barbed wire! Granted I dont want that either.  smile.gif
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I love mesh fencing. But, it HAS TO BE PUT up correctly - otherwise it can be a disaster.

Beth
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Gabe
post Jul 20 2007, 06:34 PM
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QUOTE (fhl_stables @ Jul 20 2007, 06:42 PM)
Welllllllll it's a possibility. wink.gif

We are doing our paddocks and stalls before winter hits so I thought I'd ask b/c I wanna have stallion safe everything - when that time comes.
*


hehe ya gotta keep me updated!
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Desert Tag Arabi...
post Jul 20 2007, 06:57 PM
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QUOTE (fhl_stables @ Jul 20 2007, 06:37 PM)
Does the board fencing require a lot of maintenance?
*



We've had the board fencing for two years now, and very little maintenance so far, but there will be with time. I think the biggest job for us, pesonally, is painting--I wanted white board fence, as it is highly visible, but it already needs painted again. There a few posts that have been chewed, esp. the section between the stallion and mares (I guess he thinks he'll chew his way through...LOL tongue.gif ). So, those will eventually need replaced.
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Cheryl L
post Jul 20 2007, 07:08 PM
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We have had out board fencing for 5-6 years now, unpainted and natural and it still looks great. I don't consider it high maintenance and that is here in Michigan. We freeze and thaw and get hot and humid. We are supposed to painting it black, the same stuff you see in Kentucky. That black paint is supposed to last 5 years, whereas the white paint, 1-2 years.
Once again, we run a braided hot "wire" around the top and in between the boards.
We used to have high tensil wire and had few problems. BUT, once a friend had a tragic accident involving the high tensil and a big strapping weanling being put down, we got the board fence up the following week. There are 5 of us that will never forget that day and 4 of them still get nightmares about it.
Cheryl
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Georgia
post Jul 22 2007, 02:32 AM
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Well, my theory is that horses have to be outside long enough that they are not idiots when turned out. An hour or two a day just doesn't cut it. If I had horses that I wanted to stay in good shape were turned out all night and brought in during the day.. if you have horses out 24/7 you will notice that they are up or in the barn during the heat of the day anyway.

I have had some pretty bad fence in my day from barbed wire to fences about to fall down. My stallion always respected the fence and no accidents as my horses just were not turned out just for a few hours the biggest cause of accidents are definitely stalled horses getting to go outside for "awhile". So, I can respect the barn that watches the turn outs... they are trouble waiting to happen.

I've always just put a small pasture inbetween my stallions and my mares. I have always kept my stallions out in front of the barn and the mares behind. My stallion was stalled with the mares, if he was inside.. there was a mare beside him and across. And he was quite happy with that arrangement.

My dogs were allowed to play with the boys "only" and the boys always appreciated the play time with the dogs.

I agree with everyone on the tinsel wire fences, I had a friend that farm was already set up with it and she ran a hot wire about 3 feet from the tinsel fence. So, they couldn't get near it. so far so good with her and her horses.

Happy fencing..
Georgia
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fhl_stables
post Jul 22 2007, 03:32 AM
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Okay I had replied to some of these and now I don't see it. So I'll try again.

Beth, How do you put yours up? I plan to put it up with wood posts but not sure how far to space them.

Gabe, LOL Yes I will keep you posted. wink.gif

Desert, Yeah I know white anything for fencing seems to need a LOT of maintenance. I was looking at the horse guard fencing and thinking of brown. smile.gif I think brown would look nice and most look like wood.

Cheryl, Yes I know we'll leave our wood posts unpainted, just treated as they come. I do like unpainted the best. There is a fence up the way that they took trees and cut them then made this fence that looks SO rustic - I'm like I want THAT fence. lol

I know this one GORGEOUS little filly got into some wire and it wasn't even that high tensile - it was the coated wire and strung TIGHT. I guess she got into it some how and - well you can imagine. She had to be put down and that was horrible! Her owner had just recently gotten her and she was a delight! sad.gif So I just don't want to use smooth anything. *sigh*

Howdy Georgia! Yeah I'm sure that's why most of the horses I'm famiilar with are sane individiuals b/c they are outside most of their life.

~ Charity
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Jenny Lees
post Jul 24 2007, 10:11 PM
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: gbfahne.gif Post and rail and one strand of electric tape works for us. Here is one of our stallions Al Reeh Janoob checking out to see if any of the visiting mares are interested in what he has to offer rolleyes.gif rolleyes.gif we call him our "scanner" he is just as accurate as the vet blink.gif and the ladies much prefer his method wub.gif wub.gif Jenny
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larapintavian
post Jul 25 2007, 01:05 PM
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You also should check out your local regulations on stallion fencing. Our state/county both have regulations 'on the books' stating that all stallions must be enclosed inside at least a 6 foot high fence. While this height was undoubtedly set to include the largest of horses, our stallion fences, including the panels, with their 5 foot high top rails would still be in violation if any of our boys got out (our guys are all 15.0 to 15.1 hh).

The height requirement of the fence for stallions (in our state) is mainly to prevent them pushing on it. A fence that is chest or just above chest height is almost asking to be pushed by horses of any sex (not just stallions), especially if the enclosure is fairly small. A taller fence with the top half way up the horses neck (when he/she is looking over it) will discourage pushing, as a push puts uncomfortable pressure on the wind pipe. We've had our mares, especially the larger ones, badly damage many different kinds of chest high fences pushing on them ... some will even use their shoulders to push on a post, lol. They're certainly NOT 'dummies .... an intelligent horse quickly learns how to use his/her weight, and we need to realize they ARE smart enough to do so should they choose to. 'Course some of our mares simply jump. A bit of added height tends to discourage all attempts to push adding greatly to the longevity of the fence.

Over the years we have also learned that hanging our gates and even stall doors (or stall guards at competitions) above chest height has added greatly to their effectiveness and the length of 'life' of boards, hinges, snaps, latches, etc. while still allowing the horses to easily look out. I think the reason the stallion panels work as well as they do (even though they can move a bit) is because at close to 5' high , they are not comfortable to push by horses under about 16.1. I also think that the reason we have not had to use the hot wire around our stallions in several years is because we finally 'got the message' and have our fences at an appropriate height to discourage them from pushing or rearing over them.

Some municipalities also have regulations AGAINST hot wire. My sister was once cited by Oklahoma City for having a hot wire INSIDE her stallions' paddocks (this after a TRESPASSER filed a complaint about being shocked ... ). She was cited for having " ..... an exposed electrical wire ....." which was against city codes (never mind the fact that the person shocked was on her property without permission). If you are within a city's limits or jurisdiction, be sure to check about hot wire. Each city/town has it's own individual codes and regs.

IMO, regardless of what kind of fence you choose, do yourself a favor and spend a bit more to add that bit of extra height to the fence .... it will pay off in both peace of mind and especially in years of fence and gate service.
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Blue Pyramid
post Jul 25 2007, 02:25 PM
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I found the strongest, most long-lasting fence to be 8' RR tie posts buried at least 2.5 feet in the ground, 60" tall 2x4 welded wire mesh with a mid-level electric wire (not high tensil) to keep them from pushing under, and another 3-4 inches above the top of the mesh. I have had very little maintenance and haven't had to sew up a horse from going through the fence since I installed it in 1992.

The posts are 12' on center. I do everything 12' on center because if I wanted to add boards, 2x6x12' is the cheapest. The electric wires are wrapped through glass insulators at the corners in such a way as to pull loose if a horse gets tangled in the wire. I have never had a horse hung up in the wire but have been able to gather it up and put it right back in place. I would rather have a horse loose than cut up. My stallion decided he didn't like the middle wire so removed it. He left it in a neat pile for me to remove . . . don't ask me how he did that without getting tangled up, but he did.

When I got Himself (my stallion), I was concerned that it would be enough. The little shock it delivers will send most horses running and elicit a yowl from careless humans, but the shock makes Himself angry. He tried every side of his pasture ... once, then quit (but he was snorting and posturing at it). I have seen him lean on the spring gap over the gate to talk to a mare and I know the power was on because his ears twitched every time the power surged (electric is alternate current. if it was wasn't it would kill, as my idiot neighbor discovered when he installed his and went out in the morning to find fried starlings hanging from it like so many upside-down cloths pins).

I have been through a lot of fences and if I had the money, I would use the v-mesh with 2x6 vinyl boards midway and at the top of the mesh (I hate painting) but I would still use the electric break-away wire. It would be pretty with the white vinyl boards, wouldn't it?

JMHO hope it is of some use to you.
Samantha
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