This site requires the Adobe Flash Player.
straightegyptians

Welcome Guest ( Log In | Register )

> Chips (not Ocd), Foals need to be chipped after 01.07.09
bterlaan
post Mar 12 2008, 05:19 PM
Post #1


Gold Member
Group Icon

Group: Members
Posts: 2172
Joined: 16-March 03
From: germany
Member No.: 28



From The Horse.com:

http://www.thehorse.com/ViewArticle.aspx?ID=11464

European Union to Require Microchipping of Foals
by: Edited Press Release
March 10 2008, Article # 11464

Member states of the European Union have reached an agreement on a new regulation that will revise existing equine identification legislation. The main new requirement is the compulsory microchipping of foals born after July 1, 2009.

The requirement will not be retroactive for older horses and the regulation does allow for member states to approve alternative methods to the microchip.

Microchips provide a link between a horse and its passport and strengthen existing horse identification requirements. Such unique identification of equidae could also prove useful for disease control and surveillance purposes and for the recovery of lost or stolen horses.

In the U.K., the Department of Environment, Food, and Rural Affairs will be consulting with the horse industry over the implementation of the new requirements.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
2 Pages V   1 2 >  
Start new topic
Replies (1 - 14)
An American Bree...
post Mar 12 2008, 06:25 PM
Post #2


Gold Member
Group Icon

Group: Members
Posts: 1618
Joined: 6-July 03
Member No.: 606



I will wait to see if this is implemented. If so, then I will include all of Europe as off limits for purchase of or sale to as well as not allowing any horse on my property that has come from Europe after July 1, 2009, better yet , just from 2009 on.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Guest_julieM_*
post Mar 12 2008, 07:59 PM
Post #3





Guests






Dear American Breeder, why?

Juliem
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Pashon2001
post Mar 12 2008, 08:09 PM
Post #4


Senior Member
*****

Group: Members
Posts: 236
Joined: 29-November 04
Member No.: 1996



Although a good idea, I think its another way of making us pay yet more money out to register a foal, its barely affordable now!!!
Grrrrrrrrr gbfahne.gif
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
bterlaan
post Mar 12 2008, 08:12 PM
Post #5


Gold Member
Group Icon

Group: Members
Posts: 2172
Joined: 16-March 03
From: germany
Member No.: 28



"...the regulation does allow for member states to approve alternative methods to the microchip"
This looks to me as a way out, provided the country wants it. In NL chips for horses have been an obligation since some time.

And BTW, American Breeder, as long as they do not take hoofprints of European Horses entering the US, as they take fingerprints of their human counterparts as standard procedure, you have nothing much to complain about, methinks. tongue.gif
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Dave
post Mar 12 2008, 08:46 PM
Post #6


Senior Member
*****

Group: Members
Posts: 249
Joined: 23-November 05
Member No.: 2920



I'd like to know what the EU or the national governments will do to you or your foals if you refuse microchipping?

Americans are very leary of big governemnt. Government is a necessary evil and therefore less is best.

The EU has been a bad deal for Europe which is one reason why my German in laws want to leave.

Dave
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
An American Bree...
post Mar 12 2008, 09:43 PM
Post #7


Gold Member
Group Icon

Group: Members
Posts: 1618
Joined: 6-July 03
Member No.: 606



I do not agree. I do not want equine identification regulation here in the United States. I believe in the US Constitution and the Bill of Rights.

Here is the link to my page
http://www.egyptian-arabian.com/farms/dhabi/sales.html
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
diane
post Mar 12 2008, 10:31 PM
Post #8


Gold Member
Group Icon

Group: Members
Posts: 2218
Joined: 18-March 03
From: Vale View, Toowoomba, Australia
Member No.: 117



I didn't and still do not agree with the compulsory microchipping here in the "EI affected parts of Australia" but it is done... four of my Arabians have been compulsory microchipped to get them home (no chip, no travel). Some issues are out of the persons' hands. I understand that the EI scenario provided a "wonderful" test situation for the use of microchips in horses at least here in Australia. The only "consolation" is that the vets have supposedly worked out the best location to ensure the chip stays in place.
mad.gif - yes and so sad.gif ... insult to injury... so far, there's nothing in place or in the pipeline to recognise this compulsory microchipping as a legitimate indentification process with the AHSA ie the horse still needs to be visually branded and, where necessary, microchipped blink.gif rolleyes.gif

ps "equine indentification regulation"... this includes branding (in which ever form)? I'm against microchipping because its a foreign piece in a body. Any equine indentification process is only as good as the system that controls it. I shouldn't be so cynical... here in Australia (due to the EI outbreak) there have been multiple dbases created to control such a system which do not interact with each other rolleyes.gif ergo... there's simply no system in place to guarantee any honesty to an equine indentification process ~ any process! Maybe this will come together ... later cool.gif
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
ShaeMcC
post Mar 13 2008, 03:01 AM
Post #9


Senior Member
*****

Group: Members
Posts: 216
Joined: 3-December 07
From: Texas, United States
Member No.: 9826



I am of the same opinion as American Breeder. Here in the US, we are fighting NAIS. It isn't the first step of the process that concerns me, its the ultimate outcome of having everything policed right down to humans being microchipped and freedoms stripped in layers. We lose our right to liberty in all of this, as well as the right to own property, and ultimately PRIVACY. I know its coming, but I'm going to fight it every step of the way.

I highly recommend a television series that has been airing in the UK, called, "The Last Enemy." It puts ALOT in perspective and really shows how we can go too far in the name of security. Excellent TV show for enjoyment as well.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
bterlaan
post Mar 13 2008, 09:52 AM
Post #10


Gold Member
Group Icon

Group: Members
Posts: 2172
Joined: 16-March 03
From: germany
Member No.: 28



Dear US friends, are you not aware of the fact that the US government requires compulsory fingerprinting of all foreign visitors and they want to know all their personal data, including credit card numbers (!!!) to be kept for many years in databases that are not controlled by any trustworthy official body. Also, all money traffic (yes, also in Europe) is watched by US bodies. So I am sorry, I do not find your belief in "no government" very realistic. Big brother is watching you and the biggest of hem all are the US. I at least have never heard of the EU watching US money traffic or taking fingerprints of foreign visitors when entering the EU. But that may come: bad ideas have a sinister way of spreading....

As a Dutchwoman living in Germany, I consider the EU is a great thing and it is a pity that it is abused for less acceptable things. But that is valid for national governments as well. The EU makes it possible to travel across borders freely, also with horses, to pay with one currency, to make international payments without extravagant fees for the banks, etc. etc. Those who hate it are those who have no international contacts at all and do not see its advantages in their personal lives. Also, the EU gets blamed for a lot of bad things that it has nothing to do with. As I said, the chip regulation has already been implemented on a national basis in NL. No EU.

I can still remember the days I could not go and see my relatives in another country because of heavy visa requirements and extreme money restrictions. This is still the case for travel outside the "big blocks". I know quite some people living in the US who could not get their relatives over in order to help out in diffcult family situations. Visa refused, no reason given. That situation does not exist anymore within the EU, as it used to do within Europe not very long ago. People who hate the EU do not know what they are talking about, IMO.

Back to the chips:
Recently there was a story on a horse that got stolen in NL and was found back in LU, thanks to its chip. So it may have some advantages, too. But in my eyes, it is the perversities of the meat industry that caused this. Basically, it is a means to control the whereabouts and situation of horses, in principle for health reasons, but of course it opens up various other possibilities that I do not like either, as I hate big brothers as much as my friends at the other side of the big pond appear to do. cool.gif
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
An American Bree...
post Mar 13 2008, 04:37 PM
Post #11


Gold Member
Group Icon

Group: Members
Posts: 1618
Joined: 6-July 03
Member No.: 606



Hello Bianca, I am soo glad we were able to communicate, yes off-site and yes I do agree with you on so much of what you said. We do share of lot of the same thoughts!

Do take care.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
bterlaan
post Mar 13 2008, 05:02 PM
Post #12


Gold Member
Group Icon

Group: Members
Posts: 2172
Joined: 16-March 03
From: germany
Member No.: 28



Communication is everything, reason why I consider it of the utmost importance that people learn their own language well to begin with, so that it may also serve as a basis for learning foreign languages. biggrin.gif
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Dave
post Mar 13 2008, 07:22 PM
Post #13


Senior Member
*****

Group: Members
Posts: 249
Joined: 23-November 05
Member No.: 2920



Check out this Dutch website www.invisio.nl/antichip/. Also, go to the second page of this forum and checkout the NAIS Terror thread started by American Breeder.

The problems with microchipping are.
1. If a government can track a horse, it can track the horse's owner.
2. Horses are not food animals. They are recreational animals. They don't need to be tracked.
3. Horses don't carry very many diseases that can infect humans.
4. Horses live much longer than other species of livestock and if they are microchipped, they are more likely to develop health issues associated with microchips such as cancer. Furthermore, horses may have problems from microchipping that may limit their usefulness to their owners - riding. There is any example of this on the Dutch website.

Can one sue the EU or national government for damages? I doubt it. They'll just say "sorry" if your horse has problems.

You Europeans are too compliant.

Dave
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
diane
post Mar 13 2008, 11:36 PM
Post #14


Gold Member
Group Icon

Group: Members
Posts: 2218
Joined: 18-March 03
From: Vale View, Toowoomba, Australia
Member No.: 117



The problems with microchipping are.
1. If a government can track a horse, it can track the horse's owner.
........ Not if the last registration against the m/c is not the current owner ie the information is only as good as the people maintaining it and abiding by the obligations and regulations.

2. Horses are not food animals. They are recreational animals. They don't need to be tracked.
.........Sometimes, this is not the case... there are many that are bred as recreational animals and end up at the meatworks. I am aware of a disastrous divorce which led many prized bloodlines/individuals being taken to the meatworks.

3. Horses don't carry very many diseases that can infect humans.
.......... but there is always that odd chance and this is what they are advocating the m/c will assist in preventing the transference. It was a main reason behind m/c horses here in Australia.

4. Horses live much longer than other species of livestock and if they are microchipped, they are more likely to develop health issues associated with microchips such as cancer. Furthermore, horses may have problems from microchipping that may limit their usefulness to their owners - riding. There is any example of this on the Dutch website.
.............insufficient is known about long term use of m/c and this is one of the wonderful reasons why the compulsory situtation in Australia due to EI is being relished as a test case.


They'll just say "sorry" if your horse has problems.
........yep. Though never say never... there could be a precedent somewhere or a totally united objection smile.gif
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Dave
post Mar 14 2008, 04:30 AM
Post #15


Senior Member
*****

Group: Members
Posts: 249
Joined: 23-November 05
Member No.: 2920



Diane,

I'm speaking in general terms. I'm not willing to take a chance that microchips are safe. If a horse is injected with a microchip that can track that horse, it will take a lot of energy to do it. I believe we're talking about microwaves capable of causing genetic damage. There's a mentality of let's do it because we can.

I have a filly that I consider to be very very valuable. I'm not willing to put her at risk because some stupid politicians were lobbied or paid of by chip companies.

It would be really great if horse owners in Australia and Europe would fight against microchipping. I don't want to hear from some stupid politician or government flunkie, "well they do it in Australia and Europe, so what's your problem".

Dave

QUOTE (diane @ Mar 14 2008, 12:36 AM)
The problems with microchipping are.
1. If a government can track a horse, it can track the horse's owner.
........ Not if the last registration against the m/c is not the current owner ie the information is only as good as the people maintaining it and abiding by the obligations and regulations. 

2. Horses are not food animals. They are recreational animals. They don't need to be tracked.
.........Sometimes, this is not the case... there are many that are bred as recreational animals and end up at the meatworks.  I am aware of a disastrous divorce which led many prized bloodlines/individuals being taken to the meatworks.

3. Horses don't carry very many diseases that can infect humans.
.......... but there is always that odd chance and this is what they are advocating the m/c will assist in preventing the transference.  It was a main reason behind m/c horses here in Australia.

4. Horses live much longer than other species of livestock and if they are microchipped, they are more likely to develop health issues associated with microchips such as cancer. Furthermore, horses may have problems from microchipping that may limit their usefulness to their owners - riding. There is any example of this on the Dutch website.
.............insufficient is known about long term use of m/c and this is one of the wonderful reasons why the compulsory situtation in Australia due to EI is being relished as a test case.
They'll just say "sorry" if your horse has problems.
........yep.  Though never say never... there could be a precedent somewhere or a totally united objection  smile.gif
*
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post

2 Pages V   1 2 >
Reply to this topicStart new topic

 

Lo-Fi Version Time is now: 25th April 2014 - 03:28
This site requires the Adobe Flash Player.