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> Foot And Mouth Decease-egypt, To be careful
HLM
post Mar 17 2012, 04:04 PM
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Dear All

Our Newspaper released today the information that more than 2000 catle died in Egypt on this terrible decease and over 20,000 are infected, and will die.

this decease is highly contagious and kills fast. In 1945 we had it in East Germany and lost thousands of cattle and horses, mostly farm horses. I saw one actually dropping dead pulling a cart while the other one- then unhitched- made it to the next field and then dropped dead. They bloat up badly within a short time.

I am deeply concerned about the horses in Egypt and hope that strong precausion is taken, i.e. to quarantine oneself, to not let anybody near the horses, and/or have them go with their feet through a strong disinfectant bath, to NOT touch any horse/cows/buffalo etc. and have all owners also stay away from other cows/buffalo and horses.
Sanitary conditions is a MUST!

I dont know what can be done about this in Egypt, if there is a prevention inoculation or what.
Of course, one also should avoid any display shows, of any kind.

I am sorry that I have to report this and pray that our fellow breeders/owners do not suffer
losses.

Hansi
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MHuprich
post Mar 17 2012, 06:47 PM
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Foot and mouth disease does not affect horses. I was in a USDA vet office last week with a friend who was getting export docs done, and they had an interesting pamphlet on this disease. See http://www.aphis.usda.gov/newsroom/hot_issues/fmd/fmd.shtml
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Nadj al Nur
post Mar 17 2012, 06:55 PM
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That's true. It only affects animals with split hoofs.
C
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HLM
post Mar 17 2012, 06:56 PM
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QUOTE (MHuprich @ Mar 17 2012, 08:47 PM) *
Foot and mouth disease does not affect horses. I was in a USDA vet office last week with a friend who was getting export docs done, and they had an interesting pamphlet on this disease. See http://www.aphis.usda.gov/newsroom/hot_issues/fmd/fmd.shtml



that is new to me, than I just wonder what the German horses died off, thousands.
HLM
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Caryn Rogosky
post Mar 17 2012, 07:36 PM
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QUOTE (HLM @ Mar 17 2012, 08:56 PM) *
that is new to me, than I just wonder what the German horses died off, thousands.
HLM


Maybe vesicular stomatitis? The symptons are similar to hoof and mouth disease.
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MHuprich
post Mar 17 2012, 07:40 PM
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QUOTE (Caryn Rogosky @ Mar 17 2012, 03:36 PM) *
Maybe vesicular stomatitis? The symptons are similar to hoof and mouth disease.



Vesicular stomatitis has been confirmed only in the western hemisphere http://www.aphis.usda.gov/publications/ani...omatitis_07.pdf

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Caryn Rogosky
post Mar 17 2012, 07:46 PM
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QUOTE (MHuprich @ Mar 17 2012, 09:40 PM) *
Vesicular stomatitis has been confirmed only in the western hemisphere http://www.aphis.usda.gov/publications/ani...omatitis_07.pdf


Interesting, thanks Melissa!
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HLM
post Mar 17 2012, 08:26 PM
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QUOTE (HLM @ Mar 17 2012, 07:56 PM) *
that is new to me, than I just wonder what the German horses died off, thousands.
HLM



I now can do only one thing to check with some elders still alive in my former country. I am now curious myself.
Was convinced it was foot and mouth. Will advise when I have a reply, which might take a while, as they dont have a computer or fax machine, or some even a telphone..

Hansi
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Dr Daniel Wigger
post Mar 19 2012, 05:54 PM
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ZITAT(HLM @ Mar 17 2012, 09:26 PM) *
I now can do only one thing to check with some elders still alive in my former country. I am now curious myself.
Was convinced it was foot and mouth. Will advise when I have a reply, which might take a while, as they dont have a computer or fax machine, or some even a telphone..

Hansi


Hansi - horses are not susceptible for foot and mouth disease. As far as I know "Rotz" (glanders) was one of the highly contagious diseases responsible for the breakdown in horse population in the eastern countries of Europe during and after the two world wars. It is caused by a highly contagious bacteria (Burkholderia mallei) which can also cause skin and mucosal lesions like in foot and mouth disease AND it is extremely contagious for humans, too. It is classified as a biological weapon of the category B.
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Caryn Rogosky
post Mar 19 2012, 07:16 PM
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QUOTE (Dr Daniel Wigger @ Mar 19 2012, 07:54 PM) *
Hansi - horses are not susceptible for foot and mouth disease. As far as I know "Rotz" (glanders) was one of the highly contagious diseases responsible for the breakdown in horse population in the eastern countries of Europe during and after the two world wars. It is caused by a highly contagious bacteria (Burkholderia mallei) which can also cause skin and mucosal lesions like in foot and mouth disease AND it is extremely contagious for humans, too. It is classified as a biological weapon of the category B.


Oh goodness, how frightening. What are the origins of this bateria, or rather, where is it found?
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HLM
post Mar 19 2012, 07:37 PM
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QUOTE (Dr Daniel Wigger @ Mar 19 2012, 07:54 PM) *
Hansi - horses are not susceptible for foot and mouth disease. As far as I know "Rotz" (glanders) was one of the highly contagious diseases responsible for the breakdown in horse population in the eastern countries of Europe during and after the two world wars. It is caused by a highly contagious bacteria (Burkholderia mallei) which can also cause skin and mucosal lesions like in foot and mouth disease AND it is extremely contagious for humans, too. It is classified as a biological weapon of the category B.



Thanks Dr Daniel, I guess that is what it was. It was horrible. Some of my favored horses died of it.
Nice seeing you here posting, keep it up, I always enjoyed your posts.

take care
Hansi
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Dr Daniel Wigger
post Mar 20 2012, 01:13 PM
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Some info about glanders:

glanders

Since the 1990s glanders is considered a re-emerging disease. With world wide horse transport the bacteria is very likely to spread again.
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HLM
post Mar 20 2012, 01:25 PM
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QUOTE (Dr Daniel Wigger @ Mar 20 2012, 03:13 PM) *
Some info about glanders:

glanders

Since the 1990s glanders is considered a re-emerging disease. With world wide horse transport the bacteria is very likely to spread again.



Thank you Dr Wigger. All exports we made importing country rules cover duren and glanders.

I feel that often all this is spread because of neglect. From day one, when I took my horses to a show ground, I first disinfected their stalls- walls, floors etc before I stalled them. When they came home I put them into a special quarantine building for 8 days and let no ousider near them. I also always had our horsevans disinfected and took every precaution to prevent carrying in deadly deceases. May be others do the same, at least I hope so.

I also do not let any visitor,outsider touch my horses "heads", unless they washed and disinfected their hands first.
Many people love stroking a horse's head down to the nostrils and can transmit all sort of things.

But I also am a stickler on CLEAN EQUIPMENT- and use sheets under the saddle pad, easily washed after each use.
And of course I want their stalls as clean as my own bedroom, and that is done.

Take care
Hansi
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Caryn Rogosky
post Mar 20 2012, 04:04 PM
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QUOTE (Dr Daniel Wigger @ Mar 20 2012, 03:13 PM) *
Some info about glanders:

glanders

Since the 1990s glanders is considered a re-emerging disease. With world wide horse transport the bacteria is very likely to spread again.


Thank you for the link -- wow! Frightening disease, especially the thought of this bacteria being used for biological warfare. Its the stuff science fiction and horror movies are made of. Unimaginable -- the possiblities.
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