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> Do You Know Your Competition?, Do you know why the FRENCH HORSES are .....
HLM
post Mar 26 2012, 03:02 PM
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Dear all

I think we have well over one million arabian horses recorded/registered and/or documented.
Only a small percentage , may be five percent are Asil/SEs etc.

Has anyone of you followed why the French horses are in such demand, bring such high prices and do a lot of winning?

Does anyone know which bloodlines in the pedigrees of these horses are pronouced and going back to what?
I do.

To overlook formidable competion is like saying "there is only the Volkswagen and no other make, although they all are "Cars".

Studying what other countries do, if we want to market the SEs adequately is an immense help. Producing horses which can readily compeat with the French or others, is the answer.

Let us hear your opinions and commens please.

Hansi
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orient arabians
post Mar 27 2012, 09:56 AM
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Hey Hansi,
Off which sort of competition are you talking ? racing ? endurance ? show ?
some of my SE are out in endurance, but I don't know any SE in racing, and not many in show..

Michèle
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HLM
post Mar 27 2012, 12:16 PM
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QUOTE (orient arabians @ Mar 27 2012, 10:56 AM) *
Hey Hansi,
Off which sort of competition are you talking ? racing ? endurance ? show ?
some of my SE are out in endurance, but I don't know any SE in racing, and not many in show..

Michèle



Dear Michele

At least someone replied, and I thank you.

Yes, racing, flat and endurance. We here in the USA have a lot of flat races, even managed to race at the
track of the Kentucky Derby last year, and do it again this year.Dellaware,USA is racing for decades Arabian horses, so is California,Michigan, Florida, Texas etc.etc. Same goes for Endurance. I raced ours since 1978, both flat and endurance..
,

However, what I like to find out what our people know, are aware of, what is doing so well and bring such high prices- the french Arabians-. I wondered if our people know why this is and what is so outstanding in these'
horses' bloodlines. I know what it is and am Guided. Just thought it might be another educational topic.

Thanks for your reply and I hope it wont be the only one.

Take care
hansi
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Dieter
post Mar 27 2012, 02:05 PM
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QUOTE (HLM @ Mar 27 2012, 08:16 AM) *
Dear Michele

At least someone replied, and I thank you.

Yes, racing, flat and endurance. We here in the USA have a lot of flat races, even managed to race at the
track of the Kentucky Derby last year, and do it again this year.Dellaware,USA is racing for decades Arabian horses, so is California,Michigan, Florida, Texas etc.etc. Same goes for Endurance. I raced ours since 1978, both flat and endurance..
,

However, what I like to find out what our people know, are aware of, what is doing so well and bring such high prices- the french Arabians-. I wondered if our people know why this is and what is so outstanding in these'
horses' bloodlines. I know what it is and am Guided. Just thought it might be another educational topic.

Thanks for your reply and I hope it wont be the only one.

Take care
hansi

Hi Hansi,

I have noticed the French Arabians are built for speed and they are winning flat races, therefore, race purses make them more valuable (earnings potential). I can't help but notice many of them do not have the kind of "type" that is popular these days, or the labels that would make them desirable to any specific preservation group. I am not familiar enough with their bloodlines to know specifically why they are like they are, but will guess it could be related to percentage of Muniqi blood - don't know and may be entirely wrong on that.

Have a great day.

Liz
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orient arabians
post Mar 27 2012, 02:21 PM
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I must say that french racing arabians have discutable bloodlines, no purist would like to use them.. we agree that some anglo-arabian blood had been mixte even if no stud-book would say so..
Is this looking like an arabian ?


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Michèle
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barbara.gregory
post Mar 27 2012, 02:54 PM
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For many years I helped at UK Arab races and there were a few lovely Arabs that won, even some SEs. However, as the French horses took over we saw less and less horses that looked like Arabs. When I was judging best turned out I actually had to look at my racecard to see if it was a race for purebreds or Anglos; it was almost like we were reinventing the thoroughbred. Some of the purebreds (in fact quite a lot) even had pulled manes. Is that really the way we want to go? To me the Arab should be unique, not a second rate thoroughbred. They are the most beautful of all the breeds, why spoil that? They should not only be beautiful but kind, intelligent, versatile and hardy. In breeding just for speed with no regards for type (I leave aside the contentious issue of purity) we are losing all the other aspects of the Arabian so why bother; just get a thoroughbred as they are faster and better looking.

Sorry, just my thoughts. I am sure I will be shot down in flames but I want my Arabs to be all the things that attracted me to the breed in the first place; spirited but tractable and kind; beautiful but well conformed and rideable; in fact, an all round athelete who is also stunningly beautiful.

Barbara
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HLM
post Mar 27 2012, 03:31 PM
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QUOTE (orient arabians @ Mar 27 2012, 04:21 PM) *
I must say that french racing arabians have discutable bloodlines, no purist would like to use them.. we agree that some anglo-arabian blood had been mixte even if no stud-book would say so..
Is this looking like an arabian ?


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Michèle



dear Michelle

I have seen some purebred arabs looking similar.
Manganate has an excellent pedigree in my opinion. From about 5th generation female tail line its all "Asil"

Male line, from the 4th. It appears that Latif OA (1903) a Hamdani Simri Asil stallion imported by France from Egytpt in 1909 has a lot to say.He produced "Denauste (1921) out of a Mukladieh mare Djaima (1913)
Denauste Produced Baroud II (1927) a good race winner (1/9(2-4-3-) and he produced Saint Laurent (1948)
race champion (1/8/(4-3-1) out of Madou (1939) a Mu'niqi Silfa mare ,a race champion (1/6(3-2-1).

Hundreds of predigeees carry Latif/Denauste/Burkeguy etc. and should be respected, I do.

We might not like some, but be looking at their rearends every time they are infront. they should never be underestimated. But also the SEs have top racing lines and could be formidable competitors if given a chance.
I have two studs here right now which might have a word or two to say.

Here are some more race winenrs in his pedigree:
Mandragone (`1955) (his dam) 1/9/(2-4-3), her sire Dragon (1940) (1/6/(5-1-0) and her dam
Magnesie (1949) (1/9(3-3-1)

and Manganate (1972) himself : 1/4/(3-o-o)

therefore I have to think that genetically it came through well. Too many top performers and producer in it I feel.
And I dont thnk an "Anglo" can compete with the above success that well, but there are exceptions to any rule, e.h.

Take care
Hansi

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Nadj al Nur
post Mar 27 2012, 03:33 PM
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QUOTE (barbara.gregory @ Mar 27 2012, 07:54 AM) *
For many years I helped at UK Arab races and there were a few lovely Arabs that won, even some SEs. However, as the French horses took over we saw less and less horses that looked like Arabs. When I was judging best turned out I actually had to look at my racecard to see if it was a race for purebreds or Anglos; it was almost like we were reinventing the thoroughbred. Some of the purebreds (in fact quite a lot) even had pulled manes. Is that really the way we want to go? To me the Arab should be unique, not a second rate thoroughbred. They are the most beautful of all the breeds, why spoil that? They should not only be beautiful but kind, intelligent, versatile and hardy. In breeding just for speed with no regards for type (I leave aside the contentious issue of purity) we are losing all the other aspects of the Arabian so why bother; just get a thoroughbred as they are faster and better looking.

Sorry, just my thoughts. I am sure I will be shot down in flames but I want my Arabs to be all the things that attracted me to the breed in the first place; spirited but tractable and kind; beautiful but well conformed and rideable; in fact, an all round athelete who is also stunningly beautiful.

Barbara
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No flames here,Barbara. Well said !!
C
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HLM
post Mar 27 2012, 03:40 PM
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QUOTE (Dieter @ Mar 27 2012, 04:05 PM) *
Hi Hansi,

I have noticed the French Arabians are built for speed and they are winning flat races, therefore, race purses which makes them more valuable (earnings potential). I can't help but notice many of them do not have the kind of "type" that is popular these days, or the labels that would make them desirable to any specific preservation group. I am not familiar enough with their bloodlines to know specifically why they are like they are, but will guess it could be related to percentage of Muniqi blood - don't know and may be entirely wrong on that.

Have a great day.

Liz



Dear Liz

well you are right, as usual, with the Muniqi blood. Madou (1939), dam of the great Saint Laurent (1948) indeed is a Muniqi Silfa mare going to the foundation mare "Arca" (c.1875) import by France in 1880 from the El Ghannam Tribe.
I think that tribe was in persia (Turkey may be)? I am not sure. She was a "desertbred". Therefore I guess Manganate is half a Mu'Niqi, right?

Take care
hansi



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Caryn Rogosky
post Mar 27 2012, 05:21 PM
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QUOTE (barbara.gregory @ Mar 27 2012, 04:54 PM) *
For many years I helped at UK Arab races and there were a few lovely Arabs that won, even some SEs. However, as the French horses took over we saw less and less horses that looked like Arabs. When I was judging best turned out I actually had to look at my racecard to see if it was a race for purebreds or Anglos; it was almost like we were reinventing the thoroughbred. Some of the purebreds (in fact quite a lot) even had pulled manes. Is that really the way we want to go? To me the Arab should be unique, not a second rate thoroughbred. They are the most beautful of all the breeds, why spoil that? They should not only be beautiful but kind, intelligent, versatile and hardy. In breeding just for speed with no regards for type (I leave aside the contentious issue of purity) we are losing all the other aspects of the Arabian so why bother; just get a thoroughbred as they are faster and better looking.

Sorry, just my thoughts. I am sure I will be shot down in flames but I want my Arabs to be all the things that attracted me to the breed in the first place; spirited but tractable and kind; beautiful but well conformed and rideable; in fact, an all round athelete who is also stunningly beautiful.

Barbara
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I agree on all points. I appreciate a beautiful horse and an exceptional athlete of any breed -- some are amazing. However, what I chose to own and breed are Arabans and they ARE different from other breeds in numerous ways.I believe that those differences should be treasured and maintained regardless of what sport, discipline or job the Arabian is involved in. The Arabian was not meant to be as fast as a Thoroughbred, or as high stepping as a Saddlebred -- and I don't enjoy seeing them look or behave like either of those breeds. I want them to look and behave like Arabians.
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HLM
post Mar 27 2012, 05:53 PM
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QUOTE (barbara.gregory @ Mar 27 2012, 03:54 PM) *
For many years I helped at UK Arab races and there were a few lovely Arabs that won, even some SEs. However, as the French horses took over we saw less and less horses that looked like Arabs. When I was judging best turned out I actually had to look at my racecard to see if it was a race for purebreds or Anglos; it was almost like we were reinventing the thoroughbred. Some of the purebreds (in fact quite a lot) even had pulled manes. Is that really the way we want to go? To me the Arab should be unique, not a second rate thoroughbred. They are the most beautful of all the breeds, why spoil that? They should not only be beautiful but kind, intelligent, versatile and hardy. In breeding just for speed with no regards for type (I leave aside the contentious issue of purity) we are losing all the other aspects of the Arabian so why bother; just get a thoroughbred as they are faster and better looking.

Sorry, just my thoughts. I am sure I will be shot down in flames but I want my Arabs to be all the things that attracted me to the breed in the first place; spirited but tractable and kind; beautiful but well conformed and rideable; in fact, an all round athelete who is also stunningly beautiful.

Barbara
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Barbara

Yes, you sare right. But the topic is " DO YOU KNOW YOUR COMPETION"....

I dont know about the UK, but here various people claoim they cant give their horses away. This has been so long before the economy went sour.

People, anywhere in the world, interested in breeding marketable stock for at least the amount it costs to produce them and grow them up have to know their competition or they will fail. Racing is NOT A FAD, HAS BEEN HERE FOR CENTURIES and will always be there I think.

We here in the USA have Arabian horses which no more resemble an arabian horse than I do. But they can run.
The entry forms also dont go by looks, but in certain cases by qualifications.

All I am trying here to do is our people to open their eyes, study why they cant market (those who cant) and what can be done about it. I have no problem with those wanting to breed for something they want to keep.
Better yet to test, because they might just have that Kentucky Derby winner so to speak in their back yard.

Its NOT just the French which excelle in racing, the Poles are no slouch either. And the English also have such good ones, one even winning that gruelling 100 mile race in Dubai time ago. So did the Aussies.

Take care
Hansi








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Dieter
post Mar 27 2012, 06:13 PM
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QUOTE (orient arabians @ Mar 27 2012, 10:21 AM) *
I must say that french racing arabians have discutable bloodlines, no purist would like to use them.. we agree that some anglo-arabian blood had been mixte even if no stud-book would say so..
Is this looking like an arabian ?


Attached Image


Michèle
Yes, this looks like an Arabian to me. Arabians are first and foremost a diverse breed in type. All of them have "type" which is accurately described as an overall appearance rather than a description of one, or two parts of the body. "The beautiful head, so typical of show-quality Arabians, is not necessarily typical of the desert breds, either now or in the past. It is instead patterned after artists' impressions of the Arabian head. Even a plain-headed horse looks typically Arabian when he is fired up, nostrils flared, and eyes popping. One thing not mentioned in the standard is "dryness" without which a head cannot be breedy, and in which the head is clean-cut with bone structure sharply defined, and the veins distinct. The fetish of shortness of face can be overdone, especially as such a head can also be meaty . . . the opposite of "dry". Many of the most beautiful heads are not especially short, but of course, they are not noticeably long either. It is noted that the faces of the best performance horses are rarely short, nor do they have an exaggerated dish. This may indicate a need for length in air passages, as well as room in sinus cavities, for maximum efficiency. Or perhaps this is only because few of the pretty-headed ones are worked hard enough to enable him to disprove the foregoing impression. Whatever its degree of dish or length of fore face, the typical Arabian head is unique with its ethereal beauty, it's expression of super-equine intelligence and of combined fire and sociability." write Gladys Brown Edwards. She goes on the say "The Arabian is by reputation, if not always by fact, quite short-backed, and this is presumed to account for his undeniable weight-carrying ability. The claim is often made that all Arabian horses have five lumbar (loin) vertebrae, while all other horses have six. This would put the Arabian in strange company, since "all" donkeys have but five vertebrae; half of the Przewalski horses whose skeletons were checked have five, the rest six; and these two equids can scarcely be considered short-backed. Despite that "all" claim however, nearly three-fourths of the Arabian (purebred) skeletons counted had six lumbar vertebrae, the rest of the much-vaunted five. In comparison assorted other types of horses, especially Thoroughbred and Morgan, occasionally had only five. The Arabian, however, is more often inclined to have only seventeen rather than eighteen pairs of ribs, and nearly always has two less caudal (tail) vertebrae. The short dock, compared to that of other horses, is clearly evident in Arabians, made more obvious by its high carriage. It maybe that the shorter length causes the higher carriage. The croup of the Arabian is more level than in most breeds, but not necessarily dead level. However, it does appear to be when the horse moves out, lifting his tail as soon as he starts forward, and accordingly, also lifting the first sections of the flexible caudal vertebrae." It's important to note the statement of the croup being comparatively level not at all dead level unless in motion. Dead level can sometimes be indicative of a tilted or tipped pelvis, which in mares, can create breeding problems. Gladys continues that "An Arabian should have all three breed-character points to be considered typey, but he can get by with only two - any two - and still do well in halter competition if he is also well-conformed. "Head hunters" may be content with a horse having a beautiful head, but otherwise faulty; practical horsemen are not so easily pleased. The public expects a horse to stand up to its work and one that is "all type and no horse," simply will not fill the bill."

The Arabian was and is a versatile, multi-faceted breed, so it's easy enough to accept the french racer as a purebred for me.
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SKM
post Mar 27 2012, 06:33 PM
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According to the information I have available, Madou (1939-1959) tracing to Arca (OA) is in fact of the Jelfet El Ghannam strain. French Stud Book Volume 6 states "de race de Djalfa, des arabes El-Ghannam. Arca was a bay mare who produced 11 foals in France before she died in 1899 (19 years after her import). The Jelfan (or Jilfan or Jalfan) is a Kehailan substrain. Another important mare of this strain imported to France was Wadha (OA, 1874, bay, imported from Syria to Algeria in 1877) she was a Jelfet El Dehoua which is still found to this day in Syria where they spell it as Kehailet Jalfet Dahwi, generally shortened to Jalfet Dahwi, this strain was originally bred by the Fedaan tribe. Another Jilfa strain still in Syria is the Keheilet Jalfet Sattam Al Boulad, actually usually shortened to Jalfet Sattam Al Boulad, this strain was originally owned by the Shammar tribe and was acquired from them by Butayyin Ibn Mirshid of the S’baa tribe. Lady Anne Blunt obtained her mare Jilfa from Ibn Mirshid, and Jilfa’s descendants can be found in many countries. Syria was a French protectorate for some time and many of the imports to France were from there. The horses were acquired not just for beauty, but for all their other qualities which the French needed for their huge breeding programmes. Purebred Arabians were bred to provide a permanent home-bred population which could also be out-crossed with other breeds to produce the cavalry horses they so badly needed.

I am not sure but I believe the El Ghannam tribe is/was based on the Syria/Lebanon border. It could be one of the many subtribes/families of the Bani Tamim. I dont have time to research that just now!

I am sorry if I ruffle any feathers here, but it is total western misunderstanding and nonsense to say that horses of the Managhi strain & the various substrains of it are angular, fast or long-necked - let alone "impure" in any way. If you said that to a Bedouin horse breeder in Syria, he would perhaps smile and maybe not correct you out of politeness, but privately he would feel sorry for you and assume you were sadly uneducated in the realities of his world.

So - here is some information from a talk given at the WAHO Conference in Damascus by Syrian expert Dr. Hazaim Alwair about the strains in Syria today. Take it or leave it as you will, according to your own preferences or prejudices - but these are the people that really do know what they are talking about. I am including the first part of the talk, and then the section on the Managhi strains in Syria today.

START QUOTE:
“The Daughters of the Wind” is what the Arab people used to call their horses. As you gathered from the first speaker and the film we have just seen, horses have always been a very important part of the Bedouin and the Arab culture. The horse was a survival element, why they expressed so much interest in their horses was that the horse was one of their daily tools of survival, whether helping to earn a living, going to war, or occupying other peoples’ territories, or going for pasture and moving and transporting all the time.

Now I just want to explain a little about the “Rasan” or the strains. This came from practical breeding of horses, it wasn’t just fantasy where somebody just sat down and invented the strains. They had to breed the best, they had to breed the most powerful, they had to breed the horse which would survive this harsh and sometimes very hostile environment – the heat, lack of food and lack of water. They had to breed the best of the best, to the best of the best. Purity was of the utmost importance to them because they found there was nothing to improve on these horses as they survived in this harsh environment. So it was important for them to keep them pure and not to introduce any foreign blood to them which would weaken them. Usually, if you’ve got the best, you don’t have to go around and look for something else better, if you have something doing the job there is no room for improvement.

At the time they started, they traced their horses from the father and this was a very complex issue, because not everybody used their own stallions but even so, the important stallions in the desert were very well known. Even nowadays, there are relatively few stallions and everybody knows where they are and they travel their mares to them for breeding. Every stallion, each season, would therefore have produced lots of colts and fillies, and in those days before blood tests or DNA typing it would have been difficult for the owners to prove that these foals were the progeny of particular stallions. On the other hand, when they traced the bloodline to the mother, the breeder would always know which dam produced which foal. Even if a mare was taken in war, or was sold or was owned in partnership, they would know who her dam was and which foals she had herself produced by which stallions. This made it much easier for the stallion owners as well, because it helped him to know which mare line his stallion had come from and which mares he had been used on. It doesn’t mean that that stallions are not important, in fact I think it is the opposite, but I think this is partly why certain stallions became so well known because of their strains and this is why people as well used the best of the stallions.

Now in Syria, you probably will notice it is one of the few countries in this group which still chooses stallions by strain. I was talking to Basil Jadaan recently and I asked him which stallion to use on one of my fillies, and he said to use the Ma’anagi Hedruji. I didn’t ask him the stallion’s name, we don’t often use their individual names, I just asked him ‘which Hedruji’ and he said the one bred by Ibn Ufaytan. And when he said that, I knew which stallion he meant and where it came from and that was enough proof of purity. There is no way on earth Ibn Ufaytan would have an impure stallion, he would not have lied about the pedigree of his stallion, and that’s it. This is why, when you buy horses in Syria you ask the breeder ‘Who is the father of your mare’, and he will say ‘Oh it’s the bay Ma’anagi Hedruji’. You ask ‘Which one’, he replies ‘It’s the one owned by the Sheikh of the Tai’. Most people who hear that would know which stallion he means. Probably he would not know all the registered names in the stallion’s full pedigree, maybe not even of the sire and dam, but he would know their strains and their breeders and he would know he could legitimately use this horse without worrying about introducing any foreign blood.

I started this research into Syrian strains because I found one of the most important things in our Arabian horses, is that if you speak to the Bedouin here the strains are still firmly part of their breeding programme and it is still part of how they introduce and describe their horses. I have not seen this extensively used abroad in the same way, although a lot of people elsewhere do talk about strains and they have tried to label certain types to certain strains. If you speak to the Bedouins who still breed the Saglawi, who still breed the Ma’anagi – these people are still living, their great-great-grandfathers used to own and breed these horses, they would tell you that they had never thought that the Ma’anagi Sbeyli was ugly or fast or that the Saglawi was the pretty one. They would tell you that they had always bred their particular strains because they knew which tribe they came from, who kept them, who looked after them. So if they wanted to breed a powerful horse, they would choose a powerful Ma’anaghi or a powerful Saglawi. One of the examples in recent years is Fnitel, who was the Ma’anagi Sbeyli stallion of the Risaleen of the S’baa from the Anezeh. Fnitel was a stallion who was bred extensively earlier in the last century, and he was even taken to the city of Hama to be bred. This is because, when the Ruwala attacked the S’baa, the only survivals of that battle was Fnitel and his daughters, no other horses survived that battle. So people just went straight away to use this particular stallion and started breeding to him extensively.

It’s like, when you look at the Egyptian breeding programmes, some stallions stamped their mark on the programme. And in a similar way when you talk to the Bedouin, they will remember certain stallions about which they say ‘We wish we could have bred our mares to that stallion, we wish he had lived longer’. On the other hand, they might also say ‘Oh, we wish we hadn’t bred to that stallion, he was powerful but we were disappointed in his foals’.

SNIP...
The Ma’anagieh Hedrujieh is one of the most valued and respected strains in the desert to breed from. The strain originally belonged to Ibn Hudruj of the Amarat tribe who are part of the Anezeh confederation.

Ibn Ufaytan of the Shammar has been breeding this strain for a long time and I went to talk to him about this strain. He is a very modest man, and he said he was very proud that we had come to ask about his horses. He told us that 6 human generations ago, his 5 times-great grandfather took their original mare of this strain directly from the Anezeh on the battlefield and his family has bred them ever since, probably for well over two hundred years. It took his family some time to get the mare’s provenance, because the Anezeh were very upset about losing this mare. What happened was this. When the mare was captured, the new owner went to the previous owner in the Anezeh and said ‘By Allah, who is this mare’. And the man replied, ‘I didn’t breed her but if you pay me one camel, I will give you the name of the man I took her from’. So he paid him one camel, got the name and went to see the next man, who said ‘I didn’t breed this mare, I took her from such and such a man. If you pay me one camel, I will give you his name’. This scenario was repeated until 7 camels had been given in payment to 7 different people and he reached the original breeder.

The well known Ma’anagieh Sbeylieh strain is from the Ma’anagieh Hedrujieh and took its name from the original owner, Ibn Sbeyil of the S’baa tribe. More recently, the strain was bred by Zudghum of the S’baa tribe, and by Abu Saifain of the Fedaan tribe. Abu Saifain’s great-grandfather gave his name to the Ma’anagieh Sbeyliet Abou Saifain strain. The name Saifain means “Two Swords” because the original owner of this strain carried and used two swords in battle.

Lady Anne Blunt imported Ferida from this strain to the UK, and Major Roger Upton imported Haidee. Lady Anne Blunt in her book mentions that she saw two mares taken by the Aqaydat tribe from Anezeh. Today the Aqaydat still own and breed some of the most beautiful and best Ma’anagieh Sbeylieh mares, and they will tell you they took this strain from the Anezeh. I heard about one Ma’anaghieh Sbeylieh mare, bred by the Aqaydat, who was bought by a religious man from Aleppo because they believe that the Ma’anagieh Hedrujieh was a horse of Prophet Mohammed (pboh), and they say that when the Ma’anaghieh sweats, you can see a palm-print on the right side of her neck, because this is where the Prophet put his hand on his mare’s neck. I myself have not witnessed this.

I can tell you a couple of true stories about the Ma’anagieh Sbeyliet Abou Saifain strain. About 20 years ago, the chief of the Fedaan wanted Abu Saifain’s horses, so he had to leave all the land he had bought and all his other possessions, and migrate away just to prevent his horses being taken and to protect his mares. At the time of the first registrations for the first stud book in Syria, it was very hard to reach him, he was living in very harsh circumstances in the desert. One day, when he had to dig a well to find water for his horses, he let one of his favourite mares loose and followed her as she walked. When she stopped, he dug a well where her hind legs had been, and there he found water. He was very strict about his horses’ pedigrees, for example one of his mares was bred to an Obayan stallion and this covering was witnessed by one of his sons. But because he himself was not there, he would not witness the pedigree for the foal, even though it was his son who was actually holding the mare’s head collar when she was covered. He was so honest, he said ‘They say the sire is the Obayan but I do not know, I was not there, so I cannot bear witness to that’. So this is living proof of how the Bedouins are so strict about their horses’ provenance.

The Ma’anagiet Tarboush is found in Syria, originally from the horses of the Anezeh tribe and is now bred by the Aqaydat. They were called by the Bedouins after their breeder, a religious Sufi person who used to wear a Turkish hat known as a ‘tarboush’.

The Ma’anagiet Al Aqraa’ is called after their breeder who took the Ma’anagieh Sbeylieh from the Anezeh tribe. This is a very rare strain today.
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SKM
post Mar 27 2012, 06:49 PM
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It stands to reason that if you select and breed for speed for some 80 years, as some French breeders did due to the popularity of racing for Arabians in their country, you will end up with a very different 'type' of horse than the ones bred for 'beauty' or for 'trot' or any other characteristic breeders might choose to emphasise, for the same length of time. It does not mean the fast ones are any less 'pure' than the 'pretty' ones or the ' trotty' ones.
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Nadj al Nur
post Mar 27 2012, 07:32 PM
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I am so glad you posted all of that. Thank you, and may I have your permission to quote it elsewhere ?
Cathy
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