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Robyn
Hi there,

When I first read about Arabians, I remember reading about how Bedouins viewed color. I think Chestnuts were the fastest, and Bays were the most sober, or something like that.

Now that I'm looking back for this information, I, of course, can't find it, or am finding conflicting things on the Internet. Anyone know how the Bedouins viewed bays, chestnuts, grays, blacks, and so forth?

Also I read in one place that yellow dun with a flaxen mane and tail was called “the color of the Jew,” and shunned, but in another place, they were known as Asfar (sp?) and highly prized. Then in other places, "asfar" means white.

I've also read in some places that black is prized and in others that horses were killed for being black because they couldn't handle the desert heat.

I am looking both for any knowledge you can impart or any books or literature that discuss this stuff and clarify some of the conflicting stuff I've picked up over the last couple of years.

Thank you! rolleyes.gif

Robyn
heidip
The Bedouins had their own thoughts when it came to the color of a horse. They viewed color as an indicator of a horse’s personality and qualities.

According to the book, “The Horses of the Sahara” first published around 1850 by General E. Daumas, translated by Sheila M. Ohlendorf, the most highly regarded colors to the Arab people were white, black and bay. A white horse should be “…like a silk flag, without bare patches, and with a black ring around his eyes.” A black horse should be “...as night without moon or stars;” and a bay “almost black or golden.”

As far as the characteristics of color go, Daumas wrote, “White that is the color of princes, but cannot stand the heat. The black brings good luck, but fears rocky ground. The chestnut is the swiftest; if someone assures you that a horse flew, ask what color he was, and if you are told chestnut, believe it.” He goes on to report that, “The bay, he is the hardiest and most sober. If someone tells you that a horse leapt to the bottom of an abyss without injuring himself, ask what color he is, and if you are told bay, believe it.”

To illustrate the point, Daumas goes on to recount the following tale: “Ben-Dyad, a chieftain renowned throughout the desert, …found himself one day being pursued by Saad-el-Zanaty, sheik of the Oulad-Yagoub. He turned towards his son and asked: ‘Which of the enemies’ horses are in the lead?’

“The whites,’ answered his son.

‘“That is well. We’ll get on the sunny side and they will melt as if they were mad of butter.’

“A little later, Ben-Dyab turned to his son and demanded: ‘Which are the horses now that are closest to us?’

‘“The blacks,’ his son shouted at him.

“Good. We’ll take to the rocky ground and will have nothing to fear…’

“They changed their course and very soon the black horses were outdistanced. A third time Ben-Dyab asked: ‘And now which horses are in the lead?’

‘“The liver chestnuts and the brown bays.’

‘“In that case,’ yelled Ben-Dyab, ‘Sweat, my children, sweat and heels to our horses, for those (horses) could easily overtake us if, during the entire summer we had not given barley to our own.”’
gadonatella
Wasn't it in Judith Forbis "The Classic Arabian" that said they sacraficed the greys into the pits? They were at the bottem of the totem pole so to speak....

Regards ~~ Sandy
Mesadagirl
I read somewhere that each tribe or family valued one colour above the others. Not that they all agreed. That might be why there is conflicting information out there.

I also remember a story I was told by a very old gentleman who rasied Arabs about 40 years ago there is magic in the coat colour of an Arab and it will manifest itself to you at your time of need. I understood that to mean, like the differing tribes of Bedouins, that the colour that is best for you will let you know.

I was enchanted by his stories and would have loved even a bridle brown Arab had there ever been such a thing!

Sheri biggrin.gif
Guest
The meaning of the colours changes from country to country.
Some nations like black horses, other would prefer to kill them.

Now nearly all the mystic has gone and most of the horse breeder and owner say: A good horse has no colour.
biggrin.gif
Mesadagirl
I prefer a chestnut horse and my least favorites are greys with fleabitten being at the end of the line. Guess what my colour my horse is? Guess what colour of sE Arab I bought my daughter? Take a final guess what colour the Half Arab I just bought is? Yep grey, every one of them! blink.gif My boy is fleabitten and so is my daughters mare, although the half Arab gelding we just got is black with the odd white hairs throughout, eventually he will also be grey! tongue.gif

I think there is some kinda magic that keeps me buying these grey horses! laugh.gif

Sheri
Kimberli Nelson
Too funny, my favorite color is black yet all my favorite horses are grey!
Guest_Blossom_*
Going off the main topic, can any of you help me? I have a foal born chestnut, that looks as though it may go bay. The mane is coming through black, he is 4 weeks old, and his muzzle is dark, very dark almost black. there is no white hair anywhere near his eyes. He is sort of bay chestnut around the eyes too. Both parents are grey. Well, what do you think?
Shams
Grey smile.gif
Good luck
Wahag
Dear All smile.gif

According to : Captain Roger D. Upton (1874), he said most of the horses he sow in Syria desert with Anezah tribe were "Bay".

According to lady Anne (1878): she mentioned that the horses she sow in Arabia were: 35% Bay, 30% Grey, 15% Chestnut, & remaining were black and others.

Kind Regards,

Mohamed Awad Khaled
Kimberli Nelson
"were black and others."

Any ideas what the "others" could have been?
Wahag
QUOTE (Kimberli Nelson @ Jun 25 2006, 08:31 AM)
"were black and others."

Any ideas what the "others" could have been?
*



Please refere back to Lady Ann Blunt books, cos I have a translated copy of her book ( the tribs of al forat), I have a problem translating some colors back to English.

Best Regards,


Mohamed Awad Khaled
ELAcrisi 2
Dear Mohamed

could you give a kindo of discription how these horses are looking instead of a word? (for the term ....and others)

Thanks
christina
Mesadagirl
Hi Guest Blossom,

That baby will go grey! I'd bet money on it!

Sheri smile.gif
CenturyOak
QUOTE (Guest_Blossom_* @ Jun 24 2006, 08:50 PM)
Going off the main topic, can any of you help me? I have a foal born chestnut, that looks as though it may go bay. The mane is coming through black, he is 4 weeks old, and his muzzle is dark, very dark almost black. there is no white hair anywhere near his eyes. He is sort of bay chestnut around the eyes too. Both parents are grey. Well, what do you think?
*


Two greys do not always produce grey smile.gif I know of at least one set of grey parents that produced a chestnut one year and a bay the next! and yes, they have kept their color smile.gif

My suggestion would be wait to register until you're sure of the color... I've seen horses take until they are over a year old to start showing grey hairs biggrin.gif
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