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HLM
Dear Readers

I had recommended to some friends in Europe to visit the Aachen show. The report I got back is frightening.

Some of The remarks were: Horses were beautiful but we are afraid to own one of these Arabians, they are so eratic, so crazy and only special people can handle them. We are afraid that our children could not handle them, nor we.


People were screaming so loud, it scared us, it was almost uncivilized.

We have 2 Qhorses and wanted an Arabian, but will refrain.


I have been hearing these comments more than once also here in the USA
and have to agree, that someone who does not know the arabians, can get
bad ideas and refer such on.

I also feel, a show should not just be for the owners, but for the general public which will draw their conclusions by our behavior and that of the horses. It will drive people away.

Therefore, I am asking all your opinions as to what we can try to change
to put a better imagine of what an Arabian truly is like .

It is so sad.

Hansi biggrin.gif
Serenity Arabian Farms
Guest_BettyK_*
Sad to say, but maybe the Arab shows aren't the best place to recommend that newcomers visit!
Guest_Dave_*
Hansi,

I agree with you totally.

My wife hates shows. She hates the screaming and hype. She sees the disconnect between real horsemanship and the show arena. She hates halter. If she saw good horsemanship and good treatment of horses, she'd be happy but that's not likely.

I volunteer for the TAIL program at our local shows and I always take the visitors away from the warmup arena and go directly to the barns so the kids can pet horses and feed them carrots. While I'm giving a tour, I pray that no one will be mistreating any horses.

Dave
Billy W
I agree.......I had people a few days ago ask me after looking through a AHW magazine....why these horses looked so .....freakish(their words not mine) they are NOT arabian people...they did say that the Arabian is beautiful...but why all the goo on the face and the extreme Halter stances that is not normal.....??? I myself every chance I get Love to have people (non arabian) around my SE Gelding as they always leave with a good opinion.....not only is he gorgeous...and has all the fire that the Arabian has...but SWEET and easily managed and handled!! I Love to educate people and show them the REAL Arabian horse in all its natural glory........I truely believe I have made a few no believers take a 2nd look.
so true
The worst thing is, it doesnt just drive newcommers away sad.gif

One of my friends, that has a warmblood, went with me to a show, she left after the first 4 classes, she couldnt accept the way the horses were treated, and told me that this was why she NEVER wanted an arabian, and that it was worse than she imagined. even she asked me why a crazy horse could win, and if this was the disposition we wanted in the breed, since we would award it.
SHOgrl97
not to mention the stud fees....
Mesadagirl
This past summer was my first experience in a long while with A level showing with Arabs. I have been out of the whole showing arena in all areas of horses for years. The only time I seen anything I thought was "wrong" was the handlers working with the young halter horses at the Regional Championships. Saying they are rewarded for such treatment and training methods was proved out in the show ring.

However, I did not see anything I would have considered freakish or crazy in the warm up ring or around the show grounds. Maybe the area we show is an exception? unsure.gif If so then I am glad to be living here and lucky to have never witnessed these shows.

As for the "goo on the faces" did you know that the Quarter Horse people do the same thing? laugh.gif That made me smile!

Back a hundred years ago when I was active as a competitor at shows (not Arab) I noticed a higher level of questionable occurances. These were at two different breed type shows and a wide variety of events (Quarter Horse, 3 day eventing, showjumping, Thoughbred racing to name a few) I guess it's there maybe just better hidden? unsure.gif

Sheri
Billy W
what I was speaking of as far as "goo" is simple...I think if you want to enhance the face a bit...ok.....BUT...you look in all the Arabian Magazines and its beyond enhance....WAY more than that!!
Sabine Akel
I m afraid you are right ! we have regularly visitors coming to our farm totally surprised how cosy the horses especially the youngsters could be towards humans .
Some older mares hate visitors because they don t want to be sold , all these reactions are unexpected to them .
That s people who have seen shows essentially because arabians under a saddle in competition are rather scares .

The last colt I sold untied himself in the van & decided to travel backwards head looking out of the van ; the new owner was horrified when she noticed upon arrival , she called me rightaway , I started laughing & told her , this way you don t have to spend hours unloading him backwards.
He was bored & knew how to resolve the problem .
I told her this is the first story of many more to come with your new arabian ..

Have a look at the JORDAN SHOW thread & what Princess Alia did with Hlayyil she is a horsewoman & she knows how to ride .Maybe there is a chance for things to change , if others follow her example

Breeders of race horses have very harsh words for the show scene it makes you embarassed because you have to admit that they have a point .

I have seen in an A show a stallion presented with a broken jaw the handler didnt stop shanking the poor creature .
Nobody noticed that this horse was hurt & should have never been shown .
Just try to imagine yourself with a broken jaw & someone hitting you on the face !

Honestly with such a reputation do you think that real horsepeople won t be driven away from Arabians ?

All this is very sad but we can change it

Sabine Akel
Dietmar
I don't agree.
Hansi, me and my wife actually WERE at Aachen with some newcomer friends but they don't saw aggressive horses or nervous wracks. They were surprised that the stallions were shown face to face and were contzrollable by their handlers. And they were surprised that many stallions were "on" on command and in the next second they stood calmly besides their handlers and were very relaxed.
Of course I agree some horse had make-up too much and all this show stuff but at a whole picture my friends enjoyed the show and were not at least disgusted by what they saw.
I am sorry to disagree but I only can tell what I have experienced.
bastet1949
MMMMmmmmmm................... I know I put my neck into a rope for hanging BUT:

I was taking part in the show of the Lowland Arabian Cup 2006 August 12th - 13th and noticed the following:

There was such a yelling and noice: , helping " handlers " from outside the showring, using almost everything that makes noice to get the arabian IN the showring upset and by that "showing" themselves, with tails high, big nervous eyes and trotting if the devil himself was behind.............

The speaker took the microfoon and told the people that the judges asked for stopping that noice, asked the handlers to lett the arabians trott in theire own way , lett them walk on there own feet, show realy what they can show us how "dancing" they can be.........
and when not stopping the noice: the handler could leave the showring with his arabian.!!!!!!!
That helps , of course not total, but the noice was realy reduced .
We talked that over, later in the Asil Club and we all agreed what the speeker said on that show...............VERY GOOD JUDGES (I think)
but:
what do YOU think ????????

regards, Bastet
HLM
Dear Dietmar

That's just it, putting two stallions nose on nose. That was another question I was asked" What kind of dumb horsehandlers are these".

My question. Children or others could try to copy this and someone gets hurt.
Will these shows who permitted such dangerous display/teaching be willing to accept a multi million dollar lawsuit and can they? I remind you of people picking things up from the TV displays etc, and have been sued and LOST!.
Personally, I am glad they did.

I THINK ALL SHOWS SHOULD BE MADE AWARE OF THE CONSEQUENCES.

Hansi biggrin.gif
Serenity Arabian Farms
HLM
Dear Bsted

At the Egyptian Nationals one year the grand stand had individual groups of course, all yelling and screaming for their favorite horse. It was so bad that the horses got so upset and did not show off what they could. It was announced that if one more "noise" of this sort be heard, That horses will be excused from the ring for which the group was routing for. Dr Nasr can confirm this.

I think this could be introduced and then lets see who all gets the gate, ha!

Hansi biggrin.gif
Serenity Arabian Farms
Oliver
QUOTE (HLM @ Sep 28 2006, 07:49 PM)
Dear Dietmar

That's just it, putting two stallions nose on nose. That was another question I was asked" What kind of dumb horsehandlers are these".

My question. Children or others could try to copy this and someone gets hurt.
Will these shows who permitted such dangerous display/teaching be willing to accept a multi million dollar lawsuit and can they? I remind you of people picking things up from the TV displays etc, and have been sued and LOST!.
Personally, I am glad they did.

I THINK ALL SHOWS SHOULD BE MADE AWARE OF THE CONSEQUENCES.

Hansi biggrin.gif
Serenity Arabian Farms
*


Dear Hansi

With all due respect - in Europe handlers do this as long I can remember.
I visiting shows for more than twenty years now and in Europe the handlers
always did that. Here in Europe handlers are "playing" with their stallions,
teasing each other to show their guys to their full advantage. It's part of the game,
it's part of the excitement. They are experienced. People like Frank, Scott,
Johanna, Bart, Emma, Michael and all the others knowing exactly
what they are doing.
For example Frank likes to present his stallions in a flashy way. They even rear
sometimes - it's fun, he controll them every minute.
The handlers are no foolish kids - they are professionals. Trust them.

And please be fair. You can't prevent people doing dumb things.
When I go to the circus and see a man working with six tigers and try
to copy this and the tigers eat me - who is responsible then? The tamer?
When a professional handler is doing his job and an amateur tries to copy him
don't blame it to the handler! Again, with all due respect, but that's ridiculous.
When someone sees Michael Schumacher winning a Formula One race
at the TV and then thinks he can do the same and drives his car with
240 km againt a tree - do you really think Michael Schumacher is to blame?
Guest
QUOTE (Oliver @ Sep 28 2006, 09:24 PM)
Dear Hansi

With all due respect - in Europe handlers do this as long I can remember.
I visiting shows for more than twenty years now and in Europe the handlers
always did that. Here in Europe  handlers are "playing" with their stallions,
teasing each other to show their guys to their full advantage. It's part of the game,
it's part of the excitement. They are experienced.  People like Frank, Scott,
Johanna, Bart, Emma, Michael and all the others knowing exactly
what they are doing.
For example Frank likes to present his stallions in a flashy way. They even rear
sometimes - it's fun, he controll them every minute.
The handlers are no foolish kids - they are professionals. Trust them.
*


It still doesnt make it right, and it is STILL dangerous! but I kind of hope someone will get badly hurt someday, it seems like it's the only way they get the message.
Horses are not toys! and they should not be threated as such, just because the so-called pro is handling them... I have more than once seen Frank pretty close to get hit in the head by one of the horses he was showing, it was pure luck that nothing happened!
ETC
This is Ramino, top five stallion in Aachen. A few days before the show. This is one of the things that makes arabian horses special. At the show they can dance around, with open nostrils and flagged tail. and still at the same time be reliable, trusting friends, totally relaxed when you ask them to!
They are fantastic horses, trying to do all that we ask them.Click to view attachmentClick to view attachment
ETC
.. And it's not only Ramino. It is just typical arabian.
Emiliusz with friend..Click to view attachment
Cheryl L
At our shows, ACS, Class A or local fair, we show our Arabians in halter in a very flashy way. My gelding was a breeding stallion and when it came down to all breed halter championships for the geldings, we put him nose to nose with a friends Arabian stallion. He was flashy and controlled and stood like a rock. He had a crowd of fairgoers follow him back to the stalls, where he stood like a rock and had people pet them.

We are going to have disagreements about showing WITHIN our OWN breed, let alone outsiders. I try to do my best to dispell the myths.
Cheryl
ETC
Res. Nations Cup stallion 2006 Fernando, together with Emiliusz, two days after the show.Click to view attachment
ETC
QR Excel..Click to view attachment
ETC
four mares, all champions on the way to the forest for some excersize..
At the show, hot and showy, but at home, carrying the girls carefully without saddles. Arabians are easy, intelligent and reliable horses. Click to view attachment
Guest
Johanna these pictures are great!!!
They look alot more like real horses when they are ridden wub.gif
ETC
Another arabian, too sleepy to get up, when face is getting clipped. It is a two year old colt.Click to view attachment
Meg
Lovely pictures Johanna!

Regards from Sweden
ETC
girls, with 3 mares each in hand..

Just want to show what a wonderful breed this is! New people, who are curious about arabians, should be introduced by touching them! It can easily give the wrong impression watching a show without knowing how they really are, and then blame them for something they don't deserve!Click to view attachment
ETC
Ramino again..Click to view attachment
ETC
And Ramino..
This is what the horses do. Their normal life. The shows are just a couple of moments in between!Click to view attachment
Guest
But this is not something special for arabs, you can find a lovely disposition like that in almost every breed, if they have been threated well smile.gif
ETC
Khidar, helping our vet to make christmas cards..
It is no end of the pleasure you can have with arabians! Do not let shows scare people!! Everyone who has arabians at home knows better, and have to help promoting them! More pictures!!Click to view attachment
ETC
Of course you can find this in every breed. Everything depends on how you treat them! What I like to show is that they are neither crazy or hysterical. Many people think arabians are!!
BaileyArabians
Arabians today are one of the few breeds where the United States Equestrian Federation allows children to exhibit stallions in show ring classes limited to riders under 18.
Guest
True, they are much more sensitive than other breeds, so unfortunally it doesnt take much to spoil those lovely creatures sad.gif and that goes for both showing and ridding. I have seen arabs that have been spoiled by riders that was used to ride those big warmblood horses, and then decided to get an arab, they thought they could ride them as their warmbloods, after a while they got a horse that they couldnt ride anymore, some of the horses changed from the easiest sweetest horse to the devil...

Your pictures show absolute trust from both sides smile.gif
Roger
QUOTE (Guest @ Sep 28 2006, 09:42 PM)
It still doesnt make it right, and it is STILL dangerous! but I kind of hope someone will get badly hurt someday, it seems like it's the only way they get the message.
Horses are not toys! and they should not be threated as such, just because the so-called pro is handling them... I have more than once seen Frank pretty close to get hit in the head by one of the horses he was showing, it was pure luck that nothing happened!
*



You hope someone gets badly hurt?! You have got to be kidding me. It's no wonder you don't sign your name. That is one of the sickest statements I have evr read. I can't believe anyone would actually make a statement like that.
HLM
Eh folks, you dont have to convince me, remember I am a strong advocate for the arabian horse. Just convince those watching some of those shows referred to, if you are still able to lure them to your farm and horses.

As far as that guest is concerned, saying sombody getting hurt, I think what he/she meant: "Until someone gets hurt" no action will be taken.
As usual, we put a lid on the well, after the child drowned, right?

When a young one sees us elders do something, they think that's the way to go.
We need to think of what we are teaching, and they watching it brighteyed and bushytailed.

Hansi biggrin.gif
Serenity Arabian Farms
Eagleridge Arabian Farm
QUOTE (HLM @ Sep 29 2006, 09:01 AM)
Eh folks, you dont have to convince me, remember I am a strong advocate for the arabian horse. Just convince those watching some of those shows referred to, if you are still able to lure them to your farm and horses.

As far as that guest is concerned, saying sombody getting hurt, I think what he/she meant: "Until someone gets hurt" no action will be taken.
As usual, we put a lid on the well, after the child drowned, right?

When a young one sees us elders do something, they think that's the way to go.
We need to think of what we are teaching, and they watching it brighteyed and bushytailed.

Hansi biggrin.gif
Serenity Arabian Farms
*


Dear Hansi

I mean no disprespect, but why on earth would you recommend your friends in Europe to go to Aachen, particularly if they are Quarter Horse People. Would not it have been better to have sent them to a Sport Horse day, you know what happens at Aachen so WHY??? huh.gif blink.gif

Regards
Jenni
CarolHMaginn
Is there a "Newcomer" Welcome Committee at the Aachen show? I think that newbies should not be sent on their own - perhaps having a more experienced escort or chapparone who would take them to different barns following the classes so they could see the horses not in their "show" mode might be beneficial.

An actor on the stage acts differently than at home with friends. A fighter in the ring appears violet until you see him at home with his son or daughter... There is a place and a time for making a public display, and there is a time and a place to hang out with friends... This is not different with horses and so people just should understand that Arabians being so smart - understand that a show must be showy and exciting. When at home as you can see - people practically sit under them - very different time and place there...

Carol
Georgia
Heck, it has driven a lot of us oldtimers away. dry.gif mad.gif

Georgia
BaileyArabians
I'm certain that there are people who are considering arabians that also read this board for information.

So I definately think showing the arabian well *here* isn't a wasted effort.

Also we must remember that not only children are learning from this and are perhaps of various levels of experience with different breeds of horses.

I would also like to think that most arabian owners are sensible independant people not prone to snap judgements. I don't feel compelled to attempt to convince any other sort of person to look futher into the breed.

If anything, I would say they shouldn't like the way arabians are currently shown, but that never had anything to do with the breed itself. It's been around long before these modern types of showing and halter is such a very small part of its capabilities.

I too would recommend a different show for first timers or at least some sort of a warning of what goes on before sending someone off to go see a haltershow.
Guest
Having got into the Arabian show sceen for the first time last year, having worked with many different types of horses before. I was shocked and dismayed to witness several things that would never happen with other breeds or shows:

1. The halters used are not of a safety standard that would be allowed anywhere else in the horse world.
2. The chains under the horses chins allows for the less experienced handlers to potentially cause great damage to the horse, if not break their jaw causing a need for the animal to be destroyed. Also, in youngsters the chains have been known to split the roots of teething bumps, thus requiring surgery to remove them.
3. The noise from the crowd at the shows, for the youngsters being shown especially, causes the horses to be frightened and, in most cases, will end up with the horse being nervous and difficult to handle. Which, where the arabian horse is so intelligent and emotional a creature is just cruel.

In conclussion: You will end up with horses that have a bad reputation in the world for being crazy and also of no use to anyone with these behavioural problems. No wonder the rest of the horse world wont touch arabian horses thinking they are too difficult to handle. mad.gif
Echo1
Oh PLEASE say no more. Anyone who wants to change the Arabian horse into some peanut pushing, nose to the ground, training gimmic, who can't go faster than a snail's pace in the showring.... has no business in the Arabian horse business anyway...

Dear Guest, I suppose you are a QH breeder of sorts..first they are called Arabian Horses. smile.gif Let's look at your horses too while we're at it.

Did anyone ever see a Quarter Horse Halter show... let me say it's about as exhilarating as watching paint dry and you can hear a pin drop...gosh forbid anyone should sneeze they'd get thown out of the arena because they 'startled' the poor horse and made his tail swish. All the horses are half doped up, to hide their lameness, completely destroyed because they have hooves smaller than a teacup, with about 1200 pounds of steriod induced flesh resting upon them. Quarter Horse halter horses are RARELY considered riding horses, they simply cannot stay sound and half of them go sterile at an early age from all the steriods they put them on....please.....by the age of 7 those horses are so washed up, many of them are falling over from a heart attack by that age...don't get me started as to suggest we should follow this path or they set some great example in halter...NAH I'd rather see the baby oil on the muzzle that can be washed off than to think of the drugs these horses are on and how cruel that is to do to any animal. It was the QH people that brought drug testing into the AHSA.

SImply if someone cannot appreciate the Arabian horse in all it's glory for what it is, then what's the point? It makes about as much sense as me trying to show a QH at the Egyptian Event.

Dear Hansi,
I don't attempt to lure anyone into Arabian horses, in fact, I don't really think that we need to convince anyone on them either. Let the Arabian be who he is, and he will attract his own admirers. Those who don't understand him or appreciate him and try to make him into a QH or a Warmblood, are the same people who will do him more disservice in the long run.
Marilee
While I have had the privilege of having 3 different Egyptian Arabian stallions over the years, I would not sit under them or let them graze next to me on a short lead if I were seated.. Once again, others new to this might emulate the photos shown. You might "trust" your horse, but they could still move to chase a fly or suddenly be startled. I do love the photos of your lovely horses under saddle.


When I talk to the Breeders Alliance group regarding the April 2007 show here in Las Vegas, be assured I will speak up about this very point. Yes, they want to market to people here in Las Vegas, but to me it needs to be carefully and safely done with respect to the horse, and presented to all economic groups, not just to the rich tourist or the wealthy hotel owner/gambler. As we have said in other threads, our greatest markets are children, converts from other breeds, or people who always wanted a horse in their youth but never got one. We need to continue the love of horses from books or movies or current events: the wild horses of the West, Misty of Chincoteague, The Black Stallion, Black Beauty, Hidalgo, Seabiscuit, Ruffian, Barbaro, the Lone Ranger and Tonto, Roy Rogers and Trigger, King of the Wind, Spirit, etc.........!!! I watched some of the jumping (cross-country and stadium) and dressage from the Aachen show (3-day eventing) last week and it brought tears (of happiness) to my eyes. There are so many others out there just like us, newcomers or oldtimers..., who are just waiting to see, pet, maybe ride/own/lease our wonderful Egyptian Arabians. Another thread discusses the worth/marketability of our geldings. I believe that if more of us did the grassroots promotion to counteract what we don't like (the hype, the pressure to win, the abuse of the horse), then there will be a change. If people keep hearing positive about our Egyptians, then the negative should reduce. We will always have those owners/trainers/breeders who will do anything at any price to the horse or the breed. Are we part of the solution or part of the problem? I choose to speak up and respect my horses and their heritage. biggrin.gif

In 3 weeks I will again (my 8th annual) take my horses to the Las Vegas Farm Festival for estimated 9,000 children/teachers/parents, and my own kindergarten class is excited to see and pet teacher's horses!! They might never get to own one, but they will have a positive experience with mine. We showed as well in the 80s, 90s, and 00s, but there were certain things we would not do to or with them, even for a win. Honesty and safety are the best advertisers for our horses. (Pyramid Society member since 1981)
cooper
All this is an interesting perspecitve on the differeces between breeds.
All of the following is either my own opinion or from my personal experiences.
I have been to and conditioned a paint horse for the world paint horse show in Ft. Worth Texas. I do not like the way the stallions are shown. Putting a lip chain on all the stallions and fastening it with wire to the halter so that the horse is SAFE to be shown is, in my opinion, an admission that none of those horses can be trusted to be in the same arena with each other. That same paint horse stallion broke the jaw of his owner a few months later when she was riding him in the pasture and he SPOOKED and she was thrown off of him. Now, what is my opinion of paint horses? I think that the OWNERS and the way the horses are shown and treated , they are the real problem, in my opinion. WIth Quarter Horses I feel the same. Just like they have prejudices against arabians maybe!
Hansi, why didnt you tell those people that went to Aachen that our arabian stallions are for the most part, controllable enough to be nose to nose and everyone including the owners stay safe.
I cannot stand the mentality of all the Quarter Horse stallion owners I've personally met. Their Stallions are callled STUDS and are kept in stalls because they are considered too dangerous to be out in a pasture or corral to see all that is going on around them. Eventually, these horses do become dangerous to have around because they are not treated like a Stallion should be. They are STUDS. NOT TO BE TRUSTED. GIve me a break! Who knows what the real temperment of these stallions really are because they are not given even the chance to prove themselves as descently mannered horses in the REAL WORLD.
Im not joking when I say this....I tell people who are interested in owning an arabian that the biggest difference and most important, in my opinion is safety. Presented with a situation where the horse gets scared and wants to flee and you are riding the horse, I've found, from my own experiences with them that the Quarter Horse or Paint Horse will turn and run off and doesnt care one ioda about you or what is happening to you. An Arabians will not do that. They will take you into consideration and not let you be harmed. Now this is from my personal experiences. When people bash arabians, I wonder how much of that is from their own experiences or from what they have heard from others.
I've been in these exact situations and can speak from experience. I've never had an Arabian roll over on me because the horse got scared and decided to act like an idiot! Or just plain ol' run off with me. Attached is a picture of a dangerous arabian with my 4 year old I took just this morning. She is trying to decide when it would be best to eat him for lunch. He was extremely scared of her! tongue.gif
Robert 1
Dear Hansi,

With all due respect, I can't agree with what you are saying on this site, are we driving newcomers away, when in fact we are drawing new comers to the Arabian Horses and the Show World. wink.gif
This is a picture of our stallion Rasmoniet that we raised and trained, he knows 17 verbal comands and this one shows him rearing which was taught to him so to create excitment and attention when he was showed several times at the Egyptian Event. He will also stand quiet only moving his ears waiting for a signals, he will get all pumped up on a lead line before entering the show ring all of which is done on comand. He is trained to perform and this allows for an exciting performance by him.
The stallions are not going into the show ring untrained they are taught to work with the trainer, they are smart horses and love to create excitment, when the crowd screams or applauds this doesn't frigthen the Arabian Horse they simply realize that people are enjoying them show off and perform for them.
Click to view attachment

This is another stallion that I showed at the Egyptian Event for his owner, he was worked with for some time to understand and what is expected of him when he is in the ring with other stallions. This is well rehersed at the farm before he goes to the show. Stallions going nose to nose does not create a danger, i use this method from a very young colt age to stop him from being submissve to the bigger or older stallion and it incourages the colt to try and pump up and get big and to stand his ground and call to the other stallion without any dangerous moves because once again it is not the first time that he has done this, some of these stallions are presented and trained since they were two and perhaps younger
in most cases.
Click to view attachment
The excitment the cheering are all what a Arabian Horse Show is all about.
And please don't compare the Arabian horses shows to the Quarter horse shows, I went to a few of those Quarter Horse Shows and fell fast asleep in my lawn chair next to the rail, the thing that woke me up was a Quarter horse standing still infront of me blocking the heat of the sun. wink.gif
Robert,
Echo Hill Arabians
HLM
Dear Jenny

I have never been in Aachen to a show, so had no idea. I thought there my friends could see many different types of beautiful arabians horses. They have two sons, who have the Qhorses and the daughter wanted an Arabian horse.

So it is my ignorance to act as I did. However, I have advised them of what an Arabian is really like,. in the hands of "sane" horse folks. Please believe me, I never give up trying to convince people that it is wonderful to own an Arabian horse, possibly an SE.

Have a grand evening
Hansi biggrin.gif
Serenity Arabian Farms
HLM
No my dear cooper, I can not tell people that the Arabian stallions are safe enough to go nose on nose. NO STallion IS!! in that moment the instinct comes through and it only takes a fraction of a second to have an accident.
What is one to proof anyway with this nonsense? This is how Botswana got hurt at the last EE.

We have/had many stallions and each one is child safe, meaning a child can go into their paddocks, stalls and play with them. those who have visited us willbe able to confirm the gentleness of these studs. However, when I take one of them out, bypassing another paddock, they do like to eat each other up, although controlled by me. I know horses TOOOOOOO well, that even I will never take a chance, because a horse is a horse is a horse.

Hansi biggrin.gif
Serenity Arabian Farms
cooper
blink.gif Double post. I'm feeling like a non-arabian!
cooper
Well, I cant get picture my photo to post, so I give up on that.
I see your point Hansi, no stallion is ever completely safe to be around, BUT, if I had to choose a breed of horse to say the stallions were the least likely to hurt anyone, it would be the Arabian breed.
I would never let my stallion go nose to nose with another if I thought my horse couldnt handle the situation. Or if I didnt think the other handler knew what he was doing either. That would be really stupid on my part.
All the hooplah and antics are for show anyway and no one is trying to prove anything. I dont think it all is to be taken toooo seriously. It's a horse SHOW and should be taken with a grain of salt! wink.gif
Nadj al Nur
I had a neat experience a week or so ago. A fellow came out to purchase something from my husband and brought his daughter with him (about 14 or so) I happened to be in the barn grooming and the men sent her in there because she has horses too, a paint and a quarterhorse. The conversation went something like this.
She,- " so what kind of horse is that? She's sure pretty."
Me, from underneath, cleaning her udder, " she's an Arabian...Straight Egyptian actually."
She,- "no way !!"
Me, - " sure is,....why don't you think so?"
She,-" well, I never saw one that you could do that with before."
Me,- "Oh ? So how many have you met?'
She, " well none really, not up close anyway, but everybody tells me they're so hard to do anything with.Bet she wouldn't let anybody else do that!"
Whereupon I handed her the cloth and a brush and stood back. She finished grooming the mare, and then ASKED to groom my stallion, and did a pretty fair job too. When she left she was singing the praises of Arabians and telling me about how her paint gelding had bitten her on the leg just a while ago when she was picking up his foot, and that she was going to tell a few people a few things that she thought they really ought to know, and maybe sell the paint and buy a nice Arabian.
Of course, then I had to tell her that I have been bitten twice in my life, and kicked only three times, all by quarter horses, never by an Arabian..She was amazed that I have gotten away so easy, because in her short life she has had a broken wrist, 2 broken ribs, couldn't remember how many bites, and one bad kick that broke 2 fingers.
I think she will be an Arabian horse person soon.
Best
Cathy
lionsdenfarm
I think there is something to be said for letting people near your horses and letting them actually touch, pet, ride, lead, or just be with them for a little while. smile.gif

At the Minnesota Horse Expo a few years ago I let people in the stalls with my boys so they could pet them. They appreciated being able to do that and many other breeds that are considered "safer" would not let people in with or near their horses. We also led the horses around for exercise and people would come up--especially the kids--wanting to pet the pretty horse. The horses loved it!

Those types of events are not breed events but a celebration of all breeds, riding styles, and the like. It is a great way to get a horse seen as not the crazy idiot they are so often called. And the kids love poloroid pics next to the pretty horsey! wink.gif

Tracy
Guest
QUOTE (Oliver @ Sep 28 2006, 09:24 PM)
Dear Hansi
With all due respect - in Europe handlers do this as long I can remember.
I visiting shows for more than twenty years now and in Europe the handlers
always did that. Here in Europe  handlers are "playing" with their stallions,
teasing each other to show their guys to their full advantage. It's part of the game,
it's part of the excitement. They are experienced.  People like Frank, Scott,
Johanna, Bart, Emma, Michael and all the others knowing exactly
what they are doing.
For example Frank likes to present his stallions in a flashy way. They even rear
sometimes - it's fun, he controll them every minute.
The handlers are no foolish kids - they are professionals. Trust them.
*

Playing?
For me it looks like a privatshow of some arrogant people. Watch their faces then you see:
"Look at me, I'm so tough! Bring your horses to me, I can handle them all. I'm the greatest."
Everytime they are "playing" they risk an accident.
And the insiders (!) jubilate.

I agree with Hansi, for normal horse lovers the show is horror.
I went with our farrier to Neustadt, German Nationals, some years ago. I wanted to show her the best Arabian horses of Germany. She knows (and loves) my Arabians since 12 years.

At first she started lauging about the handling of the horses: "Some handlers act like toreros in Spain". laugh.gif laugh.gif laugh.gif
She asked me how the Judgement can estimate legs and topline if the horse is so terribly streched. I had no idea. unsure.gif

And she asked me why do these people present their Arabians in that ("silly") way, even if Arabians are lovely and friendly horses ("like yours").
No idea again. unsure.gif

As a farrier she was horrified about all those bad hoofs und legs. And she really could not believe that a stallion , who will have to wear horseshoes for his whole live, became National-champion.
She asked me if the judgement didn't realize it, and I had to answer that hoofs not deciding... rolleyes.gif
And I was very ashamend when she ask "These are Germanys best Arabians?
Who will buy those crazy and faultily horses? And for what???"
sad.gif
Since then she sometimes says in allusion of the Nationals "horsees with wrong papers" to my Arabians.
biggrin.gif
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