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Sharabia
Hi All,

I remember that Steve Diamond made a statement about training SEs and how they are war horses. smile.gif Does anyone have direct quotes, or better yet, if you are reading Steve, can you state it in this thread? Or, does anyone have contact information for Steve so that I can contact him personally for it?

If anyone has any other powerful quotes about Arabians - particularly their loyalty in battle, etc., please feel free to post them as well, along with the exact source for verification. If any of you want to comment individually on this aspect in your own words, please do so as well.

Thank you in advance,
Sheila Bautz
Kimberli Nelson
I told a farrier once who was a bit to aggresive for my liking, "If you want a war, my horses will give you one"
ArabianFancy
The quote I remember Steve saying was this
"Arabians were bred for centuries to be war horses, if you want a war, they'll give you one"
I use this one when talking to people about Arabians vs other breeds.
"Would you treat a Beagle and a Doberman the same way? No, you would give the Doberman more respect. Treat your Arabian with the same respect you would a Doberman!"
Gina
Sharabia
Thank you for your comments Kimberli and Gina!

The Arabian can surely be likened to a Samurai warrior - Honor, Loyalty, Integrity, Courage, etc. when treated right. I have even see them self destruct - go off feed, water, colic, become ill - when they are very close, loyal, to one person and that person is no longer around. The Samurai warrior was also very loyal to the person they dedicated their life to, and before they would betray that person, they would rather die (literally).

Like "true" warriors, they never pick or start a "fight" when they have been treated fairly, but rather, they will rise to the challenge in order to defend honor, etc., or when percieving ill treatment. Samurai warriors and their history are a very interesting subject for me, and it is unfortunate that some feel their character traits are now a form of romanticizing - character traits that seem to be such a rarity now.

To make it clear, I am not for war or death, etc. What I am intrigued by is the nature of the Arabian, and the extinct Samurai warrior - or any warrior for that matter, and I am speaking of warriors in their truest form in that they do not like to go into combat first and foremost. A warrior is first a peaceful one - an entity with wisdom and many different skills.

Thanks again ladies,
Sheila Bautz
Dakhilah
QUOTE (Kimberli Nelson @ Mar 19 2008, 04:36 PM)
I told a farrier once who was a bit to aggresive for my liking, "If you want a war, my horses will give you one"
*




Hahahha........A very good one and it's soooo true!!!! wink.gif
Greetings sas.
Lysette
QUOTE (Sharabia @ Apr 8 2008, 06:45 AM)
Thank you for your comments Kimberli and Gina!

The Arabian can surely be likened to a Samurai warrior - Honor, Loyalty, Integrity, Courage, etc. when treated right.  I have even see them self destruct - go off feed, water, colic, become ill - when they are very close, loyal, to one person and that person is no longer around.  The Samurai warrior was also very loyal to the person they dedicated their life to, and before they would betray that person, they would rather die (literally).

Like "true" warriors, they never pick or start a "fight" when they have been treated fairly, but rather, they will rise to the challenge in order to defend honor, etc., or when percieving ill treatment.  Samurai warriors and their history are a very interesting subject for me, and it is unfortunate that some feel their character traits are now a form of romanticizing - character traits  that seem to be such a rarity now.

To make it clear, I am not for war or death, etc.  What I am intrigued by is the nature of the Arabian, and the extinct Samurai warrior - or any warrior for that matter, and I am speaking of warriors in their truest form in that they do not like to go into combat first and foremost.  A warrior is first a peaceful one - an entity with wisdom and many different skills.

Thanks again ladies,
Sheila Bautz
*


What a lovely post, thank you so much for sharing. While I don't think my mare would lay down and die for me, I do think that under the right circumstances she would stand up and fight for me. Moon's mother saved her person when a newly arrived horse tried to savage her out in the field. While Moon and I have thankfully never been in such a situation, she has told other horses to "back off" when she thought they were crowding *her* human.
Bandit
A few days after my Blue Star Sa'ud arrived here last year I wanted to take some photos of her so I got a grocery store baggy and went out to her corral. We didnt know each other and so neither of us was sure of the other. I had camera ready and shook the baggy at her. I didnt shake it too too hard AT FIRST because some horses really get upset by plastic baggies being shaken at them and I didnt want to get her upset, I just wanted to get her a little excited to get a good photo or two. I had no idea she would do what she did though. She just looked at me and moved a few feet away then tried to come back to me. I shook it at her again and she did the same thing. Pretty soon Im shaking the hell out of that baggy, trying to get some distance between me and her to at least get a good body shot but she just keeps coming back.
Ive desensitized horses to plastic baggies before but even then you can get at least a wide eyed look out of them. Not this girl. She just wanted to know what it was that I had in my hand that was making the noise.

I emailed my friend who had these same type of horses and she said my mares lack of fear of the baggy is the war mare coming out in her. She has a small herd of these type arabians. When my friend has shooting events at her place the herd will come to investigate the noise instead of staying away from it.
ArabianFancy
My Tammen daughter would have taken the bag from you and chased the other horses. She actually did that one day with a plastic bag that blew into the pasture. It was funny seeing her terrorize the others horses with it biggrin.gif
Gina
Bandit
QUOTE (ArabianFancy @ Apr 9 2008, 07:53 PM)
My Tammen daughter would have taken the bag from you and chased the other horses. She actually did that one day with a plastic bag that  blew into the pasture.  It was funny seeing her terrorize the others horses with it biggrin.gif
Gina
*


OMG that is hilarious. Id of loved to have seen that. smile.gif
CenturyOak
When I went for training in Washington I left Jasoor with a boarding stable that I trusted (my daughter was the manager) and heard of how bad behaved he was while I was gone. When I came back he was oh so glad to see me and it was obvious, people that had seen him all week kicking the wall and just in general raising hell saw him standing, hip shot, head in my arms with his eyes closed and me hugging his face. Brought him home and he's back to being the sweet little angel that he is to this day.

When I told this story to a trainer friend of mine (she can chime in if she likes wink.gif she told me that he had bonded to me like Se's tend to do and he would quite cheerfully murder anyone (or anything) that threatened me. I have seen this over and over with him. He also has a very strong sense of FAIR and I've learned to handle him softly.... firmly and disciplined, but I can correct with a much softer touch than I do any of my other Arabians.

These are warhorses... with a velvet touch wub.gif
Marilee
Years ago, after only a few rides in the arena, our 3 year old AK El Maleek daughter (*Refky X Fa Halima) was ridden out into the desert from our place (snaffle bit and western saddle). Well ...a terrible rainstorm suddenly blew in, and I walked to the edge of the road looking far out into the desert and could not see anything moving except the high wind and the now sharply-pouring down rain. It was too cold and too rainy and I decided to walk back home as there was nothing I could do there, and I hoped that if the horse dumped the rider, perhaps with luck she would come back home to see our other horses. Some time later, the storm blew through to the east, and I again ventured out to the edge of the desert, to see drenched horse and rider reappear, rider laughing and very proud of the horse. They had been so far out, past running water, that they had to cross to get home, water that at one point was up to his stirrups, that they had to cross as that was the only way back from that direction (this was in about 1984---now that whole desert is houses as far as you can see). So, yes, that is a war mare. One that you would trust to take you where you needed to go, with all the heart and stamina a horse has. I had her until she passed on at 26, and she always did what I asked in any situtation, and never disappointed. In memory of Silk Maleek.
Sharabia
QUOTE (Lysette @ Apr 9 2008, 12:21 PM)
What a lovely post, thank you so much for sharing.  While I don't think my mare would lay down and die for me, I do think that under the right circumstances she would stand up and fight for me.  Moon's mother saved her person when a newly arrived horse tried to savage her out in the field.  While Moon and I have thankfully never been in such a situation, she has told other horses to "back off" when she thought they were crowding *her* human.
*



Hi Lysette,

Thank you kindly for sharing as well. smile.gif And, I know what you mean! I agree with you that they would stand up and fight for you.

An Arabian gelding I owned, who I will never forget, was named Fever. He was my best buddy and very loyal. The day I had no choice but to euthanize him, the vets had given him enough pain killer that, in their words, "should have knocked out a Clydesdale". He was laying in a bad spot/position and I asked them if they wanted him repositioned. They looked at me like "yeah, right. That horse isn't getting up" - he was in that bad of shape and very drugged. They said I could try if I wanted. I asked him to get up. He raised his head, which then swayed back and forth, and although it took him a little while and a bit of a struggle and encouragement and pleading from me, he stood up for me. The vets at the U of S were shocked. I stayed by his side until the needle that sent him to the other side was given, telling him that it was okay and that he was a good horse and companion.

I still have a braid of his hair and very fond memories of Fever and his innovative tactics and escapes, etc. that always made me smile and laugh.

With Warm Friendship,
Sheila Bautz
Sharabia
QUOTE (Bandit @ Apr 9 2008, 07:50 PM)
A few days after my Blue Star Sa'ud arrived here last year I wanted to take some photos of her so I got a grocery store baggy and went out to her corral. We didnt know each other and so neither of us was sure of the other. I had camera ready and shook the baggy at her. I didnt shake it too too hard AT FIRST because some horses really get upset by plastic baggies being shaken at them and I didnt want to get her upset, I just wanted to get her a little excited to get a good photo or two. I had no idea she would do what she did though. She just looked at me and moved a few feet away then tried to come back to me. I shook it at her again and she did the same thing. Pretty soon Im shaking the hell out of that baggy, trying to get some distance between me and her to at least get a good body shot but she just keeps coming back.
Ive desensitized horses to plastic baggies before but even then you can get at least a wide eyed look out of them. Not this girl. She just wanted to know what it was that I had in my hand that was making the noise.

I emailed my friend who had these same type of horses and she said my mares lack of fear of the baggy is the war mare coming out in her.  She has a small herd of  these type arabians. When my friend has shooting events at her place the herd will come to investigate the noise instead of staying away from it.
*


Hey Bandit,

I enjoyed your post!! You should see some of the video we have taken here of myself jumping up and down, making weird noises to try and get some reaction out of our Arabians. They pretty much just simply look annoyed about the whole thing! biggrin.gif Unless they feel playful, and "blow" back at me, which looks equally silly on my part.

We have coyotes around here, and our herd of 13 mares run on a large pasture. I am always nervous about the coyotes, until about two months ago. Well, one foolish coyote must have thought it wise to try and cross the area where we roll large round bales out for the horses to eat at will during winter. Needless to say, the coyote became a casualty of "war mares". After investigating the "victim" and confirming no bullet holes (as in being shot by a neighboring farmer and then wandering in our pasture to die) and no external attack wounds from one of our dogs, I couldn't help but smirk and look at my mares. I have narrowed it down to three main suspects here, all Arabian (two are SE's), who I can pretty much guarantee took care of that coyote. laugh.gif One hates dogs as well, and carries a vendetta against anything resembling a dog that enters the pasture. I swear I hear her whinny "CHARGE!" wink.gif biggrin.gif

With Warm Friendship,
Sheila Bautz
Sharabia
QUOTE (ArabianFancy @ Apr 9 2008, 07:53 PM)
My Tammen daughter would have taken the bag from you and chased the other horses. She actually did that one day with a plastic bag that  blew into the pasture.  It was funny seeing her terrorize the others horses with it biggrin.gif
Gina
*



Oh, Gina, that is too funny! You should get that on tape and send it in to America's Funniest Home Videos! laugh.gif

I have a young stallion here who killed a feed bag, ripped it to shreds (I posted this a couple years ago here). Here are the photos I got off the video (2005). I especially like his "karate kick". Who needs a sword?! laugh.gif When I picked up the stray pieces after laughing so hard I had tears, he walked beside me as if to protect me from a potential attack from the bag! Of course, I told him that he was a "mighty warrior" and so brave for beating the hell out of a defenseless feed bag. Too funny! laugh.gif

These horse bring so much to a person's life, don't they? wub.gif

With Warm Friendship,
Sheila Bautz
Sharabia
QUOTE (CenturyOak @ Apr 9 2008, 08:01 PM)
When I went for training in Washington I left Jasoor with a boarding stable that I trusted (my daughter was the manager) and heard of how bad behaved he was while I was gone.  When I came back he was oh so glad to see me and it was obvious, people that had seen him all week kicking the wall and just in general raising hell saw him standing, hip shot, head in my arms with his eyes closed and me hugging his face.  Brought him home and he's back to being the sweet little angel that he is to this day.

When I told this story to a trainer friend of mine (she can chime in if she likes wink.gif  she told me that he had bonded to me like Se's tend to do and he would quite cheerfully murder anyone (or anything) that threatened me.  I have seen this over and over with him.   He also has a very strong sense of FAIR and I've learned to handle him softly.... firmly and disciplined, but I can correct with a much softer touch than I do any of my other Arabians. 

These are warhorses... with a velvet touch wub.gif
*


Hi Donna,

I love your description, "These are warhorses... with a velvet touch". You write too, if I remember correctly from a post a couple of years ago. Beautiful analogy! wub.gif

So true about the SE bonding with one person and about their having a very high sense of fair. This is a mantra repeated over and over by long time breeders as well, and we also know first hand the truth in this.

RE: Bonding - We recently moved to a new, bigger farm last August. Up until that time, Curtis had been doting, grooming and riding one of our SE stallions regularly - checking fence, riding through all kinds of terrain, including swimming through slews, etc. Sheikh, the stallion, is Curtis's horse and they are very attached to each other. Anyways, once we were in the chaos of moving everything, Curtis couldn't ride and dote on Sheikh for a few days, so we sent the stallion temporarily to my brothers farm. That stallion went down hill fast in that week. He refused to eat and drank very little. Curtis was just sick about "his" horse being in such a state, as we thought Sheikh had got a very serious illness. Needless to say, Curtis took him to the University Vet Clinic. After blood tests and an examination with over night monitoring at the university, Sheikh perked up with the attention. The conclusion by the vet was - depression!!! Nothing physical at all!! So, after a "nice" vet bill, Curtis ensured he doted on that stallion no matter how busy we were with the move.

That stallion will also sulk and pout if Curtis switches gears and rides/trains other horses here without riding him.

With Warm Friendship,
Sheila Bautz

PS - About your: "Quite cheerfully murder anyone (or anything) that threatened me". That brought a smile to my face and a hearty laugh! laugh.gif laugh.gif laugh.gif
Sharabia
QUOTE (Marilee @ Apr 10 2008, 04:29 PM)
Years ago, after only a few rides in the arena, our 3 year old AK El Maleek daughter (*Refky X Fa Halima) was ridden out into the desert from our place (snaffle bit and western saddle). Well ...a terrible rainstorm suddenly blew in, and I walked to the edge of the road looking far out into the desert and could not see anything moving except the high wind and the now sharply-pouring down rain. It was too cold and too rainy and I decided to walk back home as there was nothing I could do there, and I hoped that if the horse dumped the rider,  perhaps with luck she would come back home to see our other horses. Some time later, the storm blew through to the east, and I again ventured out to the edge of the desert, to see drenched horse and rider reappear, rider laughing and very proud of the horse. They had been so far out, past running water, that they had to cross to get home, water that at one point was up to his stirrups, that they had to cross as that was the only way back from that direction (this was in about 1984---now that whole desert is houses as far as you can see). So, yes, that is a war mare. One that you would trust to take you where you needed to go, with all the heart and stamina a horse has. I had her until she passed on at 26, and she always did what I asked in any situtation, and never disappointed. In memory of Silk Maleek.
*



Hi Marilee,

What a beautiful story. These horses are so amazing, aren't they? You're Silk Maleek sounded like that loyal, devoted equine equal that those posting here all seem to appreciate, enjoy and honor.

There are certain, special horses that touch a person deeply. Thanks for sharing...

With Warm Friendship,
Sheila Bautz
Sharabia
Hi All,

I have greatly enjoyed all your posts and I am looking forward to reading more!

Sheila Bautz
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