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Desert Tag Arabians
I would like to know anything anyone can tell me about this class. How is it usually judged (eg Event), how do you trim for it (less or more), what are the judges looking for?

Thanks smile.gif
Angela
lynnbrook
AR111 Classic Head.
1. Open to purebred stallions, mares and geldings. When only one Classic Head class is offered, the entries shall be two years old and over.

2. Horses must be shown in a plain, unmarked sheet or cooler.

3. To enter the ring at a walk and line up for further inspection.

4. The head shall be comparatively small with the profile of the head straight or preferably slightly concave below the eyes. The muzzle shall be small with large nostrils, extended when in action. The eyes shall be large, round, expressive and dark, set well apart. Glass eyes shall be penalized. There should be comparatively short distance between the eye and the muzzle with deep jowls, wide between the branches. Correctness of bite must be considered. The ears shall be small (smaller in stallions than mares), thin and well shaped, tips curved slightly inward.

The above was taken from the 2009 USEF Rule book.
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lynnbrook
The EE offers
Most Classic Head Female
Most Classic Head Male

Open to any SE or Egyptian bred/sired stallions, mare or gelding. 2 yrs of age or older. To be shown in hand & covered from the poll back by a plain unmarkedfull cooler Horses to be judged on Arabian type head conformation only. Only first place ribbon/trophy to be awarded in each class

The above was taken from the 2008 EE prize list

Donna
Desert Tag Arabians
Thanks Donna smile.gif. I tried to find these rules with no luck, so that was a big help. I'd still like to hear from those who have shown in this class--what you think the judges are looking for (beyond the standard listed with the rules) and how you trim....

Thanks smile.gif
Angela
puregoldarab
Hello Angela
I couldn't help but notice your post and all the excellent information provided to you. There is one thing, however, I would like to point out, which although seemingly obvious, appears from my observation of the class, to get missed. Teach your horse to lead comfortably with a cooler. I can't tell you how many times I have seen really competitive horses get knocked out of the Most Classic Head class, because they freak out about the cooler.
All the very best of luck and look forward to seeing you in KY.
Bridgette
Marilee
Angela, what do you mean "how do you trim for it"?

Years ago we saw a MCH class, and then later with our mentor walked to the barn area to see the "winning" horse up close. Yes, he was lovely in the head and face, but as she showed us, had the poorest front legs and very rank disposition......this is when we were very new to Arabians, and thought,..... of course, the Most Classic horse should have these other great breed characteristics too.........Oh my. We found out it was the handler that got the win.............so have times changed over the years or not?????? ohmy.gif
Cheryl L
Angela.................if you are not good at trimming and blending, leave well enough alone. If you want the faceclipping pattern, I will send it to you. Just pm me your email addy and I will email it to you. Practice makes perfect and you practice on the one you are leaving home.
Cheryl
LPA
I have another query. The term "Elk Nose" is what it's called in Oz, might be the same over there, but I recently found out that it is considered a fault. Does anyone have any documented reasons WHY it's a fault? I was told it hinderes the airway (which I am having trouble understanding how, and the how was not provided). I had a filly with an elk nose that never seemed to hinder her breathing and wheneer she was animated or went for a gallop, her nostrils extended so much that any evidence of an elk nose disappeared completely, leaving a gorgeous, dry, dished head. Another reason was that it was akin to a "Roman Nose", which I also had trouble understanding as a roman nose in my early education of horses was an OUTWARD arch from the forehead which contiued to the nose????? So far, one person has mentioned that it is to be penalised in any classic head class, again wthout the knowledge of why. Can someone help before I get even more confused on the matter?
Lisa.
Desert Tag Arabians
QUOTE (puregoldarab @ Feb 17 2009, 11:28 PM)
Hello Angela
I couldn't help but notice your post and all the excellent information provided to you. There is one thing, however, I would like to point out, which although seemingly obvious, appears from my observation of the class, to get missed. Teach your horse to lead comfortably with a cooler.  I can't tell you how many times I have seen really competitive horses get knocked out of the Most Classic Head class, because they freak out about the cooler.
All the very best of luck and look forward to seeing you in KY.
Bridgette
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Good idea! My stallion has worn a sheet, but never a cooler. I imagine having trouble with him trying to eat it/pull it off, but something we'd need to practice nevertheless.

Angela
Desert Tag Arabians
QUOTE (Marilee @ Feb 18 2009, 01:01 AM)
Angela, what do you mean "how do you trim for it"?

Years ago we saw a MCH class, and then later with our mentor walked to the barn area to see the "winning" horse up close. Yes, he was lovely in the head and face, but as she showed us, had the poorest front legs and very rank disposition......this is when we were very new to Arabians, and thought,..... of course, the Most Classic horse should have these other great breed  characteristics too.........Oh my. We found out it was the handler that got the win.............so have times changed over the years or not??????  ohmy.gif
*


If the handler gets the win, I know I"m not in for any ribbons...LOL. When I asked about trimming I meant how little/how much trimming is appropriate for the class.... As far as legs/disposition....unless the horse is a jerk in the ring, it looks like determining disposition would be difficult during the MCH class, and I know they're covered with coolers so judging conformation would be difficult as well.

I am interested in this class because I am afraid I'm not ready to show in a halter class, whereas this class seems more low-key and not as scary (to me rolleyes.gif ). I also think Turbo (Asaalah) has a very classic head....LOL.

Angela
Desert Tag Arabians
QUOTE (Cheryl L @ Feb 18 2009, 01:08 AM)
Angela.................if you are not good at trimming and blending, leave well enough alone.  If you want the faceclipping pattern, I will send it to you. Just pm me your email addy and I will email it to you. Practice makes perfect and you practice on the one you are leaving home.
Cheryl
*


Thank You Cheryl smile.gif. I will pm my email addy to you. I am NOT an expert...LOL. Here are two pics of Asaalah...one from two years ago, photo by Carol Maginn, where a friend who is good at face-clipping had clipped his face for me at the show. The other was taken last fall, by Christy Hazel, and I clipped his face. I'd love to hear your opinion smile.gif.

Angela
Saazar
QUOTE (Marilee @ Feb 18 2009, 01:01 AM)
Angela, what do you mean "how do you trim for it"?

Years ago we saw a MCH class, and then later with our mentor walked to the barn area to see the "winning" horse up close. Yes, he was lovely in the head and face, but as she showed us, had the poorest front legs and very rank disposition......this is when we were very new to Arabians, and thought,..... of course, the Most Classic horse should have these other great breed  characteristics too.........Oh my. We found out it was the handler that got the win.............so have times changed over the years or not??????  ohmy.gif
*



Marilee,

the Most Classic Head class only judges the head. Legs, disposition, etc are irrelevent in this class. If the horse had a lovely head as you said that is why it won the class, not the handler.
Marilee
I know that. The horse did have a lovely head........But this was early in my education, and I thought that the winner should be a "winner". We all know that handlers are (unfortunately) judged more often than the horse itself.
Marilee
Angela, is there anyone around your area who might have some video/dvd now smile.gif of this class so you can see what it looks like in action? Also how he responds to a chain (captive or not) under his "chin"......my horse did not really like it, so we had to be careful, as he was sensitive to body language and our cues, and did not really need the chain at all. Is order of entry into the ring for this class by the # of your horse?
Desert Tag Arabians
QUOTE (Marilee @ Feb 18 2009, 02:58 AM)
Angela, is there anyone around your area who might have some video/dvd now  smile.gif  of this class so you can see what it looks like in action?    Also how he responds to a chain (captive or not) under his "chin"......my horse did not really like it, so we had to be careful, as he was sensitive to body language and our cues, and did not really need the chain at all.  Is order of entry into the ring for this class by the # of your horse?
*


Marilee--I can get a video from seehorse.com but they are, IMO, expensive. If anyone reads this and has a video I'd be happy to pay a reasonable price for the video and shipping. It certainly would come in handy.

We've worked with him having the chain under his chin with a show halter, so he should be fine. Stuff like that doesn't excite him too much. I will tug the chain (over or under) if he misbehaves, and he doesn't like to get into trouble, but it doesn't upset him at all.

I have no idea how the order of entry is determined. From what I've been told, the way the class is judged can vary a great deal as well. Sounds like you don't know what's going to happen until you hit the ring....LOL. I just don't want to get confused and do something stupid like trek off in the wrong direction or something tongue.gif .

Angela
Cheryl L
The ring steward will tell you what to do, just ask.

Usually people go into the ring, trot/walk and line up and the judges go down the line and look. When they approach you, get your horse to do his thing.

Also, you can let someone else go first and do what they do.
Cheryl
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