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Caryn Rogosky
QUOTE (Kimberli @ Mar 23 2012, 09:57 PM) *
Jo had so many barn names it was hard to know who the horses really were but I do remember a mare we call Sal. Do you think it could be the same mare?

I loved Spitty, who ended up being Amira Moniet...
And Bobby who was *Rababa imported from Egypt.
Prince who was actually BF Prince Halima

and of course my riding horse Nibbles a Waheeb daughter out of a Crabbit mare. never knew her real name.

This is one of the reasons I try (and rarely succeed) in not giving the horses barn names.


I don't know Kim, I don't remember Joanne referring to her as that, but it seems very possible. Asala was an Al Metrabbi daughter -- a gleaming purple chestnut; she was in foal to Tut when we got her. Spitty -- that's so funny! I know she called Amira Moniet "Spitfire" but never heard it shortened to Spitty. I do remember Prince but not Bobby. I guess none of them give a fig what their real names are, so long as they get plenty of food, water and good attention! smile.gif
Nadj al Nur
QUOTE (Kimberli @ Mar 23 2012, 01:57 PM) *
Jo had so many barn names it was hard to know who the horses really were but I do remember a mare we call Sal. Do you think it could be the same mare?

I loved Spitty, who ended up being Amira Moniet...
And Bobby who was *Rababa imported from Egypt.
Prince who was actually BF Prince Halima

and of course my riding horse Nibbles a Waheeb daughter out of a Crabbit mare. never knew her real name.

This is one of the reasons I try (and rarely succeed) in not giving the horses barn names.

New *Rababaa well.....wonderful mare, and she has a son by Waheeb that is a corker. ( Ibn Waheeb, or Chip, as he is known) Also one by Tut Tut, Egyptian Sundownr ( Reggie) and that is the sire of my mare.
Nadj al Nur
QUOTE (HLM @ Mar 23 2012, 01:50 PM) *
Are you OKay?

Hansi

LOL.......I wonder the same thing, Hansi.........
M.D.
QUOTE (HLM @ Mar 1 2012, 03:51 PM) *
We all know that the Arabian horse is the progenator of most all warmblood breeds. Over centuries Asil Arab blood was utlized to improve, stamina, easy keeping,endurance, speed etc, a DOING HORSE!.

While the Arabian horse is considered the most beautiful equine, that no other equine breed brings forth the intelligence and with it sensitivity, the love and affection for their owners, we must not forget these qualities
AND UTILIZE THEM WISELY.

The Bedus did not breed for horses to look at, to hug and kiss and adore, they bred for SURVIVAL, and their best were treasured highly. Only from these BEST they bred from, and their blood flows through the veins of our Arabians of today. How we handled this, is evident in many ways.

I always feel that turning these Arabians into PETS, GARDEN ORNAMENTS, turning many into mental and physical
retards is an insult to this sub-species. It stands to reason that at the time of the Bedus not every horse turned out to their liking as a DOING HORSE, or as a BREEDING HORSE, as it is today. Therefore careful grading should take place.
Horses which can not be considered special DOING HORSES, can easily be utlized as children horses, school horses
or pets in our pastures.There is nothing wrong with the latter at all. However, one can hardly consider these as breeding stock.

When we look back into the history of Eastern/Western nations, we notice that many a high commander, king or prince rode an Arabian horse into battle. Monuments of rider and horse are still visible in numerous countries.

I personally feel that ROMANCE does NOT belong in the breeding shed, but common sense should prevail.

How do you all feel about this?

Hansi

,


Yes. Everything is fine. Offbeat humor relating to somebody's response, is probably never a good thing on a forum. Sorry.
HLM
QUOTE (M.D. @ Mar 23 2012, 11:30 PM) *
Yes. Everything is fine. Offbeat humor relating to somebody's response, is probably never a good thing on a forum. Sorry.



No problem M.D., just did not get what you meant and what it referred to. So lets forget about it, okay

Hansi
M.D.
QUOTE (Nadj al Nur @ Mar 23 2012, 10:59 PM) *
LOL.......I wonder the same thing, Hansi.........




I hope you have a wonderful day. wink.gif
Caryn Rogosky
I did not demand anything of Hansi, I asked her about what her horses do in response to her own post.
Dieter
QUOTE (Caryn Rogosky @ Mar 23 2012, 02:59 PM) *
<snipped> his performance is a matter of pleasure and sport, and nothing more. <snipped>
I understand the quote in context to be a generalization. A point of information to share:

When pleasure riding turns into survival every rider would wish they were on an Arabian horse built for war and utility. Trail riding for pleasure 25 to 30 miles from camp to camp for days or weeks at a time . . . can bring certain dangers while riding through the National and State Forests. Long distance trail riders know they need to be seated on a horse able to outrun a pack of wild dogs, a pack of coyote, a mountain lion or a bear on trails that can be blocked by downed trees that the horse must jump, or steep inclines that need to be scaled and then run flat out through the forest, brush, water, uneven terrain and dart between obstacles that are sometimes hidden until the predator is outrun or loses interest. The horse has to be able to make decisions instantly in this environment, not lose its head, must have confidence in its own athletic ability as well as its rider (who would do well to let the horse work) and it's body must be up to the task in order to survive. Even pleasure horses, sport horses and show horses need to be built with "utility" in mind whether they have a daily job or not - lest it be disclosed to potential buyers the horse would probably not do well under such stress where their survival might depend on them not going insane, blowing tendons, pulling ligaments or any other such difficulty often caused by structural deficits and misguided inbreeding.

Of the 90% of Arabian horse owners in North America who never set foot in a show ring, there are thousands of long distance trail riders that relish the opportunity to spend a month or two out of every year with their horses for pleasure out riding from camp to camp. One might be surprised to find those horses dragging logs out of the woods for firewood when they aren't out trail riding, or being ridden to check fence lines carrying a pack of tools for fence repair or what have you. The well-built Arabian is perfectly suited for this because of their interest in everything that surrounds them, their keen intelligence and their stamina. That's one of the reasons Arabian blood was infused into Calvary horses so many years ago. Even today, mounted police need horses that can be in crowds, spend the day with a rider and still be ready to chase down a criminal in an urban environment. Some of the "projects" are policed on horseback because a horse can go almost wherever a human can go and they are a great restraint tool as well. Nothing would be more entertaining than to see a thief scaling a fence with a horse's teeth holding onto it's pants tongue.gif

It's important to note too, that though Hansi may own horses, it is unreasonable to expect her to be out personally riding or otherwise proving her horses under saddle. Certainly her horses can be found around the world working at their jobs. One should be able to easily understand and not question the fact that Hansi has spent a lifetime breeding horses with utility and performance in mind.

For what its worth.
JoeFerriss
..returning to the subject, I feel that romance is inextricably intertwined with the reality of the Arabian horse as reflected historically in Bedouin poetry, legend and even in antique Arabic books on the Arabian horse which use considerable eloquence in describing all the fine details of the Arabian horse, which show a very emotional sentiment for the horse. Bedouin fireside chats were filled with lengthy discussions of the Arabian horse. This was even evident when Randall Harris, Tim Parlove and myself sat up with the Tai tribe in the night drinking tea by in front of their tent in 1996 before we called it a night. The discussion was always centered on the horse. Even though the discussion has sentiment the reality of much of such poetry and discussion relates to the horse as a ridden animal so we must not forget that. Even Homer Davenport speaks romantically and eloquently about his experience the first time he rode the war mare Wadduda in the desert. He describes how the experience brought tears to his eyes. This was a mare on whose back many battles were conducted and she bore scars from some of those battles. So it would seem that this tradition of sentiment for the Arabian has been passed forward from its originating culture to all who are enraptured by this amazing breed today.
MHuprich
If the Arabian does not tug at someone's heartstrings - then it's just another animal or chore to them.
Dieter
QUOTE (JoeFerriss @ Mar 25 2012, 08:12 AM) *
..returning to the subject, I feel that romance is inextricably intertwined with the reality of the Arabian horse as reflected historically in Bedouin poetry, legend and even in antique Arabic books on the Arabian horse which use considerable eloquence in describing all the fine details of the Arabian horse, which show a very emotional sentiment for the horse. Bedouin fireside chats were filled with lengthy discussions of the Arabian horse. This was even evident when Randall Harris, Tim Parlove and myself sat up with the Tai tribe in the night drinking tea by in front of their tent in 1996 before we called it a night. The discussion was always centered on the horse. Even though the discussion has sentiment the reality of much of such poetry and discussion relates to the horse as a ridden animal so we must not forget that. Even Homer Davenport speaks romantically and eloquently about his experience the first time he rode the war mare Wadduda in the desert. He describes how the experience brought tears to his eyes. This was a mare on whose back many battles were conducted and she bore scars from some of those battles. So it would seem that this tradition of sentiment for the Arabian has been passed forward from its originating culture to all who are enraptured by this amazing breed today.
I agree that romance and reality are the Arabian. It's when people get lost in the romance forgetting about the reality that it becomes problematic. Likewise to be lost in the reality without the romance would be excluding the Arabian's rich history and understanding of the horse. So, as in everything else in life, moderation and the avoidance of extremes helps us stay balanced and thus keeps the horse balanced smile.gif
HLM
QUOTE (JoeFerriss @ Mar 25 2012, 02:12 PM) *
..returning to the subject, I feel that romance is inextricably intertwined with the reality of the Arabian horse as reflected historically in Bedouin poetry, legend and even in antique Arabic books on the Arabian horse which use considerable eloquence in describing all the fine details of the Arabian horse, which show a very emotional sentiment for the horse. Bedouin fireside chats were filled with lengthy discussions of the Arabian horse. This was even evident when Randall Harris, Tim Parlove and myself sat up with the Tai tribe in the night drinking tea by in front of their tent in 1996 before we called it a night. The discussion was always centered on the horse. Even though the discussion has sentiment the reality of much of such poetry and discussion relates to the horse as a ridden animal so we must not forget that. Even Homer Davenport speaks romantically and eloquently about his experience the first time he rode the war mare Wadduda in the desert. He describes how the experience brought tears to his eyes. This was a mare on whose back many battles were conducted and she bore scars from some of those battles. So it would seem that this tradition of sentiment for the Arabian has been passed forward from its originating culture to all who are enraptured by this amazing breed today.



Hi Joe

You are talking my thoughts. However, what I said was "romance does not belong in the breeding shed" reality does.
And the Bedus did not have their horses because of romance, but because of survival. It stands to reason that they, as we all do, are emotional about the beloved horses, as are owners of other breeds like to Paso finos,etc.etc.

Of course to the eye nothing is more beautiful than an Arabian horse and most lifesize structure in various countries resemble an Arabian horse a rider sits.

What I really meant to convey is to be most careful as to what one mates and breeds, because too many
useless horses have been created, often a liability, not an asset in various forms.

A problem I have is, that when some of us experiened breeders give advice, warning, share experiences, it is ususally taken in the wrong context and cruzified. Like "are your horses ulitarians Hansi". meaning I am doing farm work myself with them. It is this disrespect which hurts, and it is meant to hurt and discredit.

Take care
Hansi.





HLM
QUOTE (Dieter @ Mar 25 2012, 02:07 PM) *
I understand the quote in context to be a generalization. A point of information to share:

When pleasure riding turns into survival every rider would wish they were on an Arabian horse built for war and utility. Trail riding for pleasure 25 to 30 miles from camp to camp for days or weeks at a time . . . can bring certain dangers while riding through the National and State Forests. Long distance trail riders know they need to be seated on a horse able to outrun a pack of wild dogs, a pack of coyote, a mountain lion or a bear on trails that can be blocked by downed trees that the horse must jump, or steep inclines that need to be scaled and then run flat out through the forest, brush, water, uneven terrain and dart between obstacles that are sometimes hidden until the predator is outrun or loses interest. The horse has to be able to make decisions instantly in this environment, not lose its head, must have confidence in its own athletic ability as well as its rider (who would do well to let the horse work) and it's body must be up to the task in order to survive. Even pleasure horses, sport horses and show horses need to be built with "utility" in mind whether they have a daily job or not - lest it be disclosed to potential buyers the horse would probably not do well under such stress where their survival might depend on them not going insane, blowing tendons, pulling ligaments or any other such difficulty often caused by structural deficits and misguided inbreeding.

Of the 90% of Arabian horse owners in North America who never set foot in a show ring, there are thousands of long distance trail riders that relish the opportunity to spend a month or two out of every year with their horses for pleasure out riding from camp to camp. One might be surprised to find those horses dragging logs out of the woods for firewood when they aren't out trail riding, or being ridden to check fence lines carrying a pack of tools for fence repair or what have you. The well-built Arabian is perfectly suited for this because of their interest in everything that surrounds them, their keen intelligence and their stamina. That's one of the reasons Arabian blood was infused into Calvary horses so many years ago. Even today, mounted police need horses that can be in crowds, spend the day with a rider and still be ready to chase down a criminal in an urban environment. Some of the "projects" are policed on horseback because a horse can go almost wherever a human can go and they are a great restraint tool as well. Nothing would be more entertaining than to see a thief scaling a fence with a horse's teeth holding onto it's pants tongue.gif

It's important to note too, that though Hansi may own horses, it is unreasonable to expect her to be out personally riding or otherwise proving her horses under saddle. Certainly her horses can be found around the world working at their jobs. One should be able to easily understand and not question the fact that Hansi has spent a lifetime breeding horses with utility and performance in mind.

For what its worth.



Hi Liz

It is always and ever one of the same clique who will throw a dagger "like are your horses ulitarians Hansi" or something like it, meaning to day, here, by me..This disrespect is purposely meant and given, and that by so called
Arabian horse breeders and lover of Arabian Horses.

Many SERENITY HORSES have become "utilitarians" doing farm work all day long in Uruguay,Paraguay,Brazil, Panama,Argentina , etc and most lived a long life too, working to their last days and many excelling in endurance performance. Had some of our people studied a bit more what other countries are doing, none would ever make such insulting remark.
But so do the Zichy Thyssen Arabians. Even Van Fleet on Zarif -he worked all day riding fences,herding cattle etc and at night (some) played Polo never changing horses. And there are dozens of others, here and abroad which earn their living.

I can not tell anybody what to breed, its up to them, and when an inferior one is born it better was for own keeping, because such horses dont sell readily.

Just my opinion
Take care
Hansi

Caryn Rogosky
I'm not sure how, but my comment/question was misunderstood, so I'll clarify: I did not imply, and I don't expect that Hansi shoud be riding or working her own horses. My question had nothing to do with that. I'm almost twenty years younger than Hansi and I'm no longer able to ride or work my own horses because of physical disabilities. The question I asked was this:

"What essential utilitarian work do your Arabians do daily, Hansi?

By "essential" I was referring to actual work, like a job, not referring to the horses being "worked", and it was in response to Hansi's post, in which she said:

"O boy, now I have to laugh, well often ignorance is bliss eh. Even todate Arabians are used heavily under saddle for work, like in Brazil, even in Egypt grinding grain, etc. and in other countries, where machinery cant to it i.e. mountenous etc. Just as Count Zichy-Thyssen,Argentina still does, herding cattle,or whatever, as does Uruguay,Paraguay, Mexico etc. But so do many Bedus in desert countries. I guess it is we the Westerners who dont use Arabians for physical work, earning their living , thinking they are mantle pieces, eh. But may be some do, like in Montana."

My point was that the percentage of people in the West who use their Arabians to "earn their living" is quite small -- not because they don't appreciate the value and the Arabian horse as a "doing" horse and think that they are only "mantle pieces", but because relatively few people work at jobs that would require employing horses to do carry out their tasks.
Caryn Rogosky
QUOTE (HLM @ Mar 25 2012, 02:52 PM) *
A problem I have is, that when some of us experiened breeders give advice, warning, share experiences, it is ususally taken in the wrong context and cruzified. Like "are your horses ulitarians Hansi". meaning I am doing farm work myself with them. It is this disrespect which hurts, and it is meant to hurt and discredit.

Take care
Hansi.



It would be really much appreciated if the wording of my question was not altered to mean something else. I did not say or ask the question above, nor is that what it meant.
HLM
QUOTE (Caryn Rogosky @ Mar 25 2012, 03:19 PM) *
It would be really much appreciated if the wording of my question was not altered to mean something else. I did not say or ask the question above, nor is that what it meant.



I did not mean to alter, understood it as I stated.

I continously state that our peole should consider learning a bit more of what the arabians do in the USA/Canada for instance or even abroad and give credit,. All I hear "beautiful, exotic, exceptional "from some and what I then see is far, far from it. If these horses were put through tough work one could readily state what they are, but they are not,
and that is a shame. These poor horses degenerate and turn into mental and physical retards. Why, an intelligent individual, not its intelligence used/fed , can go bananas. I have seen it time and time again

Hansi



Caryn Rogosky
QUOTE (Dieter @ Mar 25 2012, 02:07 PM) *
I understand the quote in context to be a generalization. A point of information to share:

When pleasure riding turns into survival every rider would wish they were on an Arabian horse built for war and utility. Trail riding for pleasure 25 to 30 miles from camp to camp for days or weeks at a time . . . can bring certain dangers while riding through the National and State Forests. Long distance trail riders know they need to be seated on a horse able to outrun a pack of wild dogs, a pack of coyote, a mountain lion or a bear on trails that can be blocked by downed trees that the horse must jump, or steep inclines that need to be scaled and then run flat out through the forest, brush, water, uneven terrain and dart between obstacles that are sometimes hidden until the predator is outrun or loses interest. The horse has to be able to make decisions instantly in this environment, not lose its head, must have confidence in its own athletic ability as well as its rider (who would do well to let the horse work) and it's body must be up to the task in order to survive. Even pleasure horses, sport horses and show horses need to be built with "utility" in mind whether they have a daily job or not - lest it be disclosed to potential buyers the horse would probably not do well under such stress where their survival might depend on them not going insane, blowing tendons, pulling ligaments or any other such difficulty often caused by structural deficits and misguided inbreeding.

Of the 90% of Arabian horse owners in North America who never set foot in a show ring, there are thousands of long distance trail riders that relish the opportunity to spend a month or two out of every year with their horses for pleasure out riding from camp to camp. One might be surprised to find those horses dragging logs out of the woods for firewood when they aren't out trail riding, or being ridden to check fence lines carrying a pack of tools for fence repair or what have you. The well-built Arabian is perfectly suited for this because of their interest in everything that surrounds them, their keen intelligence and their stamina. That's one of the reasons Arabian blood was infused into Calvary horses so many years ago. Even today, mounted police need horses that can be in crowds, spend the day with a rider and still be ready to chase down a criminal in an urban environment. Some of the "projects" are policed on horseback because a horse can go almost wherever a human can go and they are a great restraint tool as well. Nothing would be more entertaining than to see a thief scaling a fence with a horse's teeth holding onto it's pants tongue.gif

It's important to note too, that though Hansi may own horses, it is unreasonable to expect her to be out personally riding or otherwise proving her horses under saddle. Certainly her horses can be found around the world working at their jobs. One should be able to easily understand and not question the fact that Hansi has spent a lifetime breeding horses with utility and performance in mind.

For what its worth.



Of course Arabians should be bred with utility and performance in mind -- that is part of the breed standard and Arabian type, just as is good temperament, intelligence, willingness, etc. However, regardless of how grueling and demanding the kind of riding described above is, it is undeniably sport -- which is a choice and not an essential part of life. The thought that I was trying to convey, and perhaps can be best understood within the context of the several posts I have made in sucession on the topic, is that there is also a certain amount of romance and nostalgia involved with the USING of Arabians in performance...as we harken back to the traditions of the Bedouins and what they required of their horses. We seek the qualities of the authentic desert Arabian horse, in performance, temperament, spirituality, and beauty -- not because we need to as a matter of essential survival in everyday life, but because these qualities, all of them , provide modern day Western people with pleasure, excitement, sport, inspiration and exhilaration. These sensations are all related to romance...and reality.
Caryn Rogosky
QUOTE (MHuprich @ Mar 25 2012, 02:32 PM) *
If the Arabian does not tug at someone's heartstrings - then it's just another animal or chore to them.


I so agree.
Caryn Rogosky
QUOTE (JoeFerriss @ Mar 25 2012, 02:12 PM) *
..returning to the subject, I feel that romance is inextricably intertwined with the reality of the Arabian horse as reflected historically in Bedouin poetry, legend and even in antique Arabic books on the Arabian horse which use considerable eloquence in describing all the fine details of the Arabian horse, which show a very emotional sentiment for the horse. Bedouin fireside chats were filled with lengthy discussions of the Arabian horse. This was even evident when Randall Harris, Tim Parlove and myself sat up with the Tai tribe in the night drinking tea by in front of their tent in 1996 before we called it a night. The discussion was always centered on the horse. Even though the discussion has sentiment the reality of much of such poetry and discussion relates to the horse as a ridden animal so we must not forget that. Even Homer Davenport speaks romantically and eloquently about his experience the first time he rode the war mare Wadduda in the desert. He describes how the experience brought tears to his eyes. This was a mare on whose back many battles were conducted and she bore scars from some of those battles. So it would seem that this tradition of sentiment for the Arabian has been passed forward from its originating culture to all who are enraptured by this amazing breed today.



So true, and thanks for sharing your exceptional insight Joe.
Caryn Rogosky
QUOTE (HLM @ Mar 25 2012, 03:28 PM) *
I did not mean to alter, understood it as I stated.

I continously state that our peole should consider learning a bit more of what the arabians do in the USA/Canada for instance or even abroad and give credit,. All I hear "beautiful, exotic, exceptional "from some and what I then see is far, far from it. If these horses were put through tough work one could readily state what they are, but they are not,
and that is a shame. These poor horses degenerate and turn into mental and physical retards. Why, an intelligent individual, not its intelligence used/fed , can go bananas. I have seen it time and time again

Hansi


Perhaps if you used the quote function, or copied and pasted my post into yours --- or even if you had read it carefully rather than assuming that the interpretations of others were accurate, you would not have understood it as you stated which is NOT what I wrote.
Nadj al Nur
QUOTE (Dieter @ Mar 25 2012, 05:07 AM) *
I understand the quote in context to be a generalization. A point of information to share:

When pleasure riding turns into survival every rider would wish they were on an Arabian horse built for war and utility. Trail riding for pleasure 25 to 30 miles from camp to camp for days or weeks at a time . . . can bring certain dangers while riding through the National and State Forests. Long distance trail riders know they need to be seated on a horse able to outrun a pack of wild dogs, a pack of coyote, a mountain lion or a bear on trails that can be blocked by downed trees that the horse must jump, or steep inclines that need to be scaled and then run flat out through the forest, brush, water, uneven terrain and dart between obstacles that are sometimes hidden until the predator is outrun or loses interest. The horse has to be able to make decisions instantly in this environment, not lose its head, must have confidence in its own athletic ability as well as its rider (who would do well to let the horse work) and it's body must be up to the task in order to survive. Even pleasure horses, sport horses and show horses need to be built with "utility" in mind whether they have a daily job or not - lest it be disclosed to potential buyers the horse would probably not do well under such stress where their survival might depend on them not going insane, blowing tendons, pulling ligaments or any other such difficulty often caused by structural deficits and misguided inbreeding.

Of the 90% of Arabian horse owners in North America who never set foot in a show ring, there are thousands of long distance trail riders that relish the opportunity to spend a month or two out of every year with their horses for pleasure out riding from camp to camp. One might be surprised to find those horses dragging logs out of the woods for firewood when they aren't out trail riding, or being ridden to check fence lines carrying a pack of tools for fence repair or what have you. The well-built Arabian is perfectly suited for this because of their interest in everything that surrounds them, their keen intelligence and their stamina. That's one of the reasons Arabian blood was infused into Calvary horses so many years ago. Even today, mounted police need horses that can be in crowds, spend the day with a rider and still be ready to chase down a criminal in an urban environment. Some of the "projects" are policed on horseback because a horse can go almost wherever a human can go and they are a great restraint tool as well. Nothing would be more entertaining than to see a thief scaling a fence with a horse's teeth holding onto it's pants tongue.gif

It's important to note too, that though Hansi may own horses, it is unreasonable to expect her to be out personally riding or otherwise proving her horses under saddle. Certainly her horses can be found around the world working at their jobs. One should be able to easily understand and not question the fact that Hansi has spent a lifetime breeding horses with utility and performance in mind.

For what its worth.

Now, this is a post I can agree with. It always sort of irritates me when people say, " Oh........that's only a trail horse.......he/she has never really DONE anything."
I did the Rich Hobson Cattle Drive about a dozen or so years ago with my pretty little SE, AK, never really done anything, mare. When you sign up for that, you are supposed to have two horses, and I had to do some fancy talking to get them to let me go with only one. It is roughly a hundred miles through the back country, herding cattle......sort of an old time cattle drive for modern day people. Anyhow......long story short, my mare was fresher at the end, than she was at the beginning, and there were several people with two horses that didn't make it to the end.I only did it the one time though, because even though the mare did wonderfully, I discovered that my back will not take sleeping on the ground for several nights in a row. MY limitation, not hers......
Caryn Rogosky
QUOTE (Nadj al Nur @ Mar 25 2012, 04:47 PM) *
Now, this is a post I can agree with. It always sort of irritates me when people say, " Oh........that's only a trail horse.......he/she has never really DONE anything."
I did the Rich Hobson Cattle Drive about a dozen or so years ago with my pretty little SE, AK, never really done anything, mare. When you sign up for that, you are supposed to have two horses, and I had to do some fancy talking to get them to let me go with only one. It is roughly a hundred miles through the back country, herding cattle......sort of an old time cattle drive for modern day people. Anyhow......long story short, my mare was fresher at the end, than she was at the beginning, and there were several people with two horses that didn't make it to the end.I only did it the one time though, because even though the mare did wonderfully, I discovered that my back will not take sleeping on the ground for several nights in a row. MY limitation, not hers......


I don't know how anyone could ever say,"that's just a trail horse". How many other disciplines or uses engage so many qualities of an equine, such as: intelligence, agility, courage, intuitition, restraint, confidence, trust and willingness as well as athleticism? I also don't think there is any other use of an Arabian which provides more pleasure for its owner. A good trail horse is, for sure, worth its weight in gold.
Dieter
QUOTE (HLM @ Mar 25 2012, 09:05 AM) *
Hi Liz

It is always and ever one of the same clique who will throw a dagger "like are your horses ulitarians Hansi" or something like it, meaning to day, here, by me..This disrespect is purposely meant and given, and that by so called
Arabian horse breeders and lover of Arabian Horses.

Many SERENITY HORSES have become "utilitarians" doing farm work all day long in Uruguay,Paraguay,Brazil, Panama,Argentina , etc and most lived a long life too, working to their last days and many excelling in endurance performance. Had some of our people studied a bit more what other countries are doing, none would ever make such insulting remark.
But so do the Zichy Thyssen Arabians. Even Van Fleet on Zarif -he worked all day riding fences,herding cattle etc and at night (some) played Polo never changing horses. And there are dozens of others, here and abroad which earn their living.

I can not tell anybody what to breed, its up to them, and when an inferior one is born it better was for own keeping, because such horses dont sell readily.

Just my opinion
Take care
Hansi
Hi Hansi,

Oh yes, I am well aware of Serenity horses capabilities and when I visit, I'd love to record everything yours are doing today and have done in the past if you'll let me. Would love to publish that for the public to review too because 20, 30, 40 even 100 years from now, that information will still need to be available. You should be and have every right to be proud of your lifetime accomplishments with your horses Hansi - I am smile.gif

For English being your second language, you do a great job of interpretting and responding . . . wish everyone with English as their first language would practice a little bit more patience with you.

Hoping you have a great day!!

Hugs,

Liz



Dieter
QUOTE (Caryn Rogosky @ Mar 25 2012, 10:06 AM) *
Perhaps if you used the quote function, or copied and pasted my post into yours --- or even if you had read it carefully rather than assuming that the interpretations of others were accurate, you would not have understood it as you stated which is NOT what I wrote.

Caryn, I don't think Hansi or anyone else intentionally misinterpreted your question. But I do think this question:

"What essential utilitarian work do your Arabians do daily, Hansi?

Needed more explanation. Now that you have offered further explaination, what you meant is more understood. It's easy to forget that some of the posters on this forum use English as their 2nd language and that further explanation of questions or expounding on thoughts may be needed to avoid misinterpretation. . . so perhaps if you would have mentioned why you were asking the question or rephrased it replacing the word "essential" with daily, it wouldn't have been misinterpretted initially. wink.gif
HLM
QUOTE (Dieter @ Mar 25 2012, 06:49 PM) *
Caryn, I don't think Hansi or anyone else intentionally misinterpreted your question. But I do think this question:

"What essential utilitarian work do your Arabians do daily, Hansi?

Needed more explanation. Now that you have offered further explaination, what you meant is more understood. It's easy to forget that some of the posters on this forum use English as their 2nd language and that further explanation of questions or expounding on thoughts may be needed to avoid misterpretation. . . so perhaps if you would have mentioned why you were asking the question or rephrased it replacing the word "essential" with daily, it wouldn't have been misinterpretted initially. wink.gif



Thanks Liz

I found over the years particular posters attacked every word they could find, just to be mean and hateful.
They dont have the compassion we both have and step on anything pleasing their cause.

I still think in "German" translate it into english and indeed sometimes it sounds harsh, but is not meant that way. A simple question to explain would have helped, but that was not wanted.May be these folks should write in german, then lets see how it comes out, eh.

Funny, Never had/have a problem abroad.

Take care
Hansi
Dieter
QUOTE (Nadj al Nur @ Mar 25 2012, 10:47 AM) *
Now, this is a post I can agree with. It always sort of irritates me when people say, " Oh........that's only a trail horse.......he/she has never really DONE anything."
I did the Rich Hobson Cattle Drive about a dozen or so years ago with my pretty little SE, AK, never really done anything, mare. When you sign up for that, you are supposed to have two horses, and I had to do some fancy talking to get them to let me go with only one. It is roughly a hundred miles through the back country, herding cattle......sort of an old time cattle drive for modern day people. Anyhow......long story short, my mare was fresher at the end, than she was at the beginning, and there were several people with two horses that didn't make it to the end.I only did it the one time though, because even though the mare did wonderfully, I discovered that my back will not take sleeping on the ground for several nights in a row. MY limitation, not hers......

That sounds like an exciting trip (minus the sleeping on the ground part) and it's no surprise your mare was perkier upon return as when she left.

I much prefer long distance trail riding (with overnight camping - horses on a picket line) over any other type and it's so good for the horses to get out of their daily routine every now and then. It truly is one of the best tests for a horse IMO. Michigan has a Shore to Shore Trail that is a nice ride and The Michigan Trail Riders Association does a great job hosting events. (If the link is a problem, you can google Michgian Trail Riders Association and it comes right up.) If one joiins them and rides with them, they have a chuckwagon that goes from camp to camp so participants never need to leave the group for a hot meal. Having ridden the trails for many years, I've gone through quite a few breeds conditioned for trails. The Appendix Quarter horse would go bonkers and turn into a bronc after about 10 miles, the American Saddlebred was a comfortable ride, but was too hot (an ex-show horse) to manage being in a group without walking on her hind legs, the Tennessee Walker was again a smooth ride, but started being trouble at about 10 miles throwing her head and bucking every time I asked her to do more than walk like a slug and the Morgan was willing but weary after 15 miles and less enthusiastic the next day. I watched a lot of people get ditched off their warmbloods, thoroughbreds, appaloosas, paints and mustangs with some of them coming up lame soon after the rides started. The absolute best horses were Arabians who were so interested in everythiing going on, sound in mind and body and were excited to see what was around the next turn. Many of them acted like "what, we're stopping?" when we'd ride into camp at night. But I will never forget an Aladdin son that rode with us one day, an ex-show/halter type horse, that was an absolute basket case. He could not deal with being outdoors, in the woods, water, trails, tents, other horses, etc. Poor horse spooked and spun every ten feet and there was no settling him down. The girl that bought him paid a LOT of money for him and he was beautiful, but soon learned ex-show/halter types were not the types she wanted to own.
Dieter
QUOTE (HLM @ Mar 25 2012, 02:20 PM) *
Thanks Liz

I found over the years particular posters attacked every word they could find, just to be mean and hateful.
They dont have the compassion we both have and step on anything pleasing their cause.

I still think in "German" translate it into english and indeed sometimes it sounds harsh, but is not meant that way. A simple question to explain would have helped, but that was not wanted.May be these folks should write in german, then lets see how it comes out, eh.

Funny, Never had/have a problem abroad.

Take care
Hansi

Of course - no problem. In my experience people that speak English as a 2nd language are much, much more tolerant of explaining themselves and defining words. I'm always amazed when they apologize for not being able to find the right word or using the wrong word when I feel like I shoud apologize because I haven't learned even the basics of their language. They also aren't so quick to get caught up in semantics as some English as a 1st language people do. Even mispelling a word can be ridiculed, but it's really no big deal and says more about the person doing the ridiculing than the person that mispelled the word wink.gif
tkr9
And this is how it should be:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=x-ZTKND1WDc

I don't know who this girl is, but THAT is what Arabians should be for smile.gif
Nadj al Nur
QUOTE (tkr9 @ Mar 26 2012, 01:00 PM) *
And this is how it should be:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=x-ZTKND1WDc

I don't know who this girl is, but THAT is what Arabians should be for smile.gif

Yup, ENJOY them, because they are beautiful and willing, and fun, and all manner of other good things. Thanks for posting the video.
HLM
QUOTE (Dieter @ Mar 25 2012, 08:40 PM) *
Of course - no problem. In my experience people that speak English as a 2nd language are much, much more tolerant of explaining themselves and defining words. I'm always amazed when they apologize for not being able to find the right word or using the wrong word when I feel like I shoud apologize because I haven't learned even the basics of their language. They also aren't so quick to get caught up in semantics as some English as a 1st language people do. Even mispelling a word can be ridiculed, but it's really no big deal and says more about the person doing the ridiculing than the person that mispelled the word wink.gif



Thanks Liz

I have a far more educated english in speaking than writing. Reason, I am a terrible "speller" and grab back to words I feel I can spell relatively correct. My time is often so limited, and to take a dictionary at hand, is just too much time.

Hansi
Dieter
QUOTE (HLM @ Mar 26 2012, 04:12 PM) *
Thanks Liz

I have a far more educated english in speaking than writing. Reason, I am a terrible "speller" and grab back to words I feel I can spell relatively correct. My time is often so limited, and to take a dictionary at hand, is just too much time.

Hansi

My pleasure Hansi. I don't have any trouble understanding you whatsoever whether you misspell words, use the wrong words or whatever. Any reasonably intelligent person can understand you, but some who don't think much of themselves, choose to put you down in order to make themselves feel better maybe. Pitiful, isn't it.

Liz
Dieter
QUOTE (tkr9 @ Mar 26 2012, 04:00 PM) *
And this is how it should be:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=x-ZTKND1WDc

I don't know who this girl is, but THAT is what Arabians should be for smile.gif
A beautiful horse being ridden beautifully wub.gif
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