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Full Version: Signorina - A Story Of Love Between A Mare And Stallion
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Dieter
Everyone must remember the story of Signorina (Tesio) . . . a prized mare that fell in love at first sight. This is one of my favorite stories that I wanted to share with everyone during this breeding season . . wub.gif

QUOTE
In 1880 or thereabouts a Neapolitan gentleman, Cavaliere Ginistrelli, moved his thoroughbred breeding stock from Portici, near Naples, to Newmarket, with the intention of defeating the English on their own ground.

Cavaliere Ginistrelli was a "character" with original ideas. He immediately achieved a clamorous success by breeding a beuatiful filly who was given the name of Signorina and who became a top star in her field. In 1892 Signorina, by then a five-year-old, was retired as a broodmare.

In the meantime the busy little Neapolitan had built himself a house at Newmarket, in which his bedroom adjoined the loose-box of his favourite. A window near the head of his bed enabled him to keep an eye on her at any hour of the day or night.

In spite of these attentions the beautiful Signorina was beginning to grow old without having given birth to a single colt of real quality, although bred to the most famous sires of her day.

In the spring of 1904 Cavaliere Ginistrelli had arranged to wed Signorina to the great Isinglass, whose services were in high demand at a fee of 300 guineas to be paid at the time of the betrothal.

Both the stallion and his bride-to-be were living in the town of Newmarket, at oppostie ends of a long, wide street called - I need hardly say - the High Street. During the breeding season it was the custom to promenade the third class stallions, victims of unemployment, up and down this thoroughfare with their names in large letters seductively embroidered on their blankets.

On a certain morning in April the comely Signorina was on her way down the High Street to become the bride of the remowned Isinglass. She was led by a stable boy and followed on foot by Cavaliere Ginistrelli who never let her out of his sight on these occasions. Thus she met coming toward her one of those humble thoroughbred stallions with his name, "Chaleureux", on his blanket.

Chaleureux proved worthy of the name. Stopping to savour Signorina's scent, he at once gave signs of a violent infatuation and refused to move another step. Signorina looked upon him with equal favour and also refused to move on. No amount of tugging or pleading had any effect and an amused crowd soon began to gather.

But Ginistrelli, who was a psychologist as well as a biologist, sized up the situation at a glance. "They love!" he exclaimed. "A love match it shall be." And so the proud Isinglass pocketed the 300 guineas, but waited in vain for his assignation with the fair Signorina.

Eleven Months later Signorina gave birth to a filly who was given the name of Signorinetta.

The experts, convinced that Ginistrelli was out of his mind, were openly scornful of Chaleureux's love-child. But Signorinetta grew up to be one of the greatest fillies of all time, winning the Derby and - two days later - the Oaks, a double feat which only two fillies since 1780 had been able to accomplish.

These facts are true and I was personally acquainted with all five of the individuals involved: Ginistrelli, Isinglass, Chaleureux, Signorina and Signorinetta.
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karin
Thank you for sharing this. It is really so cute! And hope for a nice foal!


Karin
Dieter
QUOTE (karin @ Apr 17 2012, 03:07 PM) *
Thank you for sharing this. It is really so cute! And hope for a nice foal!
Karin

Glad you liked it. Who knew horses could feel love?? wub.gif
Click to view attachment
I'm very excited to see the foal from this union smile.gif
barbara.gregory
As I live near Newmarket I had he
Dieter
QUOTE (barbara.gregory @ Apr 20 2012, 10:06 AM) *
As I live near Newmarket I had he

Dear Barbara,

Do they still parade the stallions every year? That would be a great event to attend - wish I lived there too! biggrin.gif
barbara.gregory
Dear Deiter

so you can see the stallions who are based thereNot sure what happened to my post, it should have read:

"As I live near Newmarket I had heard the story before but forgotten the names of the horses, thank you for remindiung me of it"

Sadly with the traffic these days it would be impossible to parade the stallions but every year the National Stud is open to visitors for the summer months. Until recently they had a trade fair at the stud over a weekend and you could see the stallions paraded and they also had other attractions; Monty Roberts has been there several times and they have riding displays. I am not sure if it still happens; I keep meaning to go but as it is now during the summer it is a busier time. It used to be held the first weekend in December and I went every year.

Barbara
Dieter
QUOTE (barbara.gregory @ Apr 21 2012, 02:44 PM) *
Dear Deiter

so you can see the stallions who are based thereNot sure what happened to my post, it should have read:

"As I live near Newmarket I had heard the story before but forgotten the names of the horses, thank you for remindiung me of it"

Sadly with the traffic these days it would be impossible to parade the stallions but every year the National Stud is open to visitors for the summer months. Until recently they had a trade fair at the stud over a weekend and you could see the stallions paraded and they also had other attractions; Monty Roberts has been there several times and they have riding displays. I am not sure if it still happens; I keep meaning to go but as it is now during the summer it is a busier time. It used to be held the first weekend in December and I went every year.

Barbara
Dear Barbara, It is sad to hear that the powers that be don't recognize how a tradition like the stallion parade should be held sacred. I can't help but think how wonderful it would be to attend an event like that - for everyone to see stallions owned by anyone paraded down a street every year. Just one day out of the year, for maybe a few hours, Newmarket could close the street for this historical event. Or maybe move it to a secondary street just to honor the tradition and the specie. It would be good for horse people and non-horse people alike to witness the raw power and beauty of magnificent stallions being paraded (and for mare owners to by chance bring their mare so she could make her choice) wink.gif

Ah well. Modern times hold no devotion to old traditions (except certain holidays where stores/corporations make lots of $$). Pity.


barbara.gregory
I guess the value of the horses these days makes it too risky in case of accidents. However, you can still see the horses exercising on the gallops and when crossing the road to the gallops cars have to give way to horses. Several years ago a stallion tbeing exercised on the gallops threw his rider and bolted down the High Street, collided with a soft top sports car and ended up in the car on top of the driver and killed him; the horses also died so safety is in everyone's minds.

Barbara
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