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Desert Tag Arabians
This has been on my mind for awhile now, and I thought I would bring it up here. Often many young or new breeders often become discouraged. Either they don't know who to turn to for questions and advice (although places like straightegyptians.com are great for that!) or they have bad experiences that hurt their confidence.

This idea came up on another forum and I thought I would bring the idea up here....If every person involved with Arabian horses, whether it be a trainer, breeder, whatever, would pledge to do one act of kindness every month....I guess most specifically centering these acts of kindness toward newcomers or those who need the help....I just thought it might make a small difference.

A couple months ago on my way home from work I got off the interstate to go through the drivethru at McDonald's (ok! I know that food is not good for you....But I was hungry! tongue.gif )...Anyway, a man was sitting by the side of the road with a sign that said "Homeless Veteran....Hungry...God Bless You". I know many people believe that the best help for the homeless is to enourage them to help themselves, but we were in the middle of the way, and I thought "How can I drive by this man munching on my Big Mac and not feel guilty?" So, I bought him a meal. Last week, another man, a different man, was sitting there, and I did the same.

It made me feel good. Now, I started to not tell those stories because I believe that boasting of good deeds diminishes the specialness of the act, but I just wanted to give an example of how great it felt.

If you're wondering more specifically by what I mean by random acts of kindness toward Arabian newcomers....well, I don't know specifically. I haven't thought this out completely. Maybe someone here will have ideas? Or, maybe someone here will tell me I'm nuts and this is a dead-end street idea? huh.gif

I like to sketch...I'm not especially good at it. The drawings always turn out okay, but never really truly resemble the model...I thought "What if I got good, and sent a sketch of people's horses to them in the mail?". Or, what if I took the time to just e-mail people who put up a new website or buy a new horse and compliment them? What if I would send a card to those who post that they have lost a horse they loved? What if I would write to those young people always posting wanted ads for that beautiful Arabian and encourage them to never stop loving or believing in the breed?

I can hear all the arguments with this idea...."many might not appreciate the gesture"...."if you want to do this--fine--but don't push it on everyone else"...."I do this anyway! You just got this idea?!"....

It just seems like that as well-meaning as it can be, that we spend so much time discussing the bad, critquing every inch of the horses, discussing the corruption...I'd try to bring a little light into our worlds with an idea that might make someone happy.

Thanks for Listening...Angela rolleyes.gif
Journey
Angela,

I think your idea is GREAT! More people should do acts of kindness. It is amazing at what a small act of kindness can do for someone. I for one always try and do this. Not everyone likes it, but hey, I still try.
HLM
Excellent idea. One time I stopped and offered a younger man a job and place to stay instead of buying him a meal.
that was DECLINED. DID NOT WONT TO WORK.

hANSI
Naughty Pine
Hi Angela,

I think this is a great idea, that the whole world could try and practice (not just horse related). I have always felt that this saying holds true. "Whatever you give in this world whether it be good or bad will come back to you 100 fold."

Patti
barbara.gregory
Dear Angela

A great idea; a lot of us do it already but there are some who need to learn to do it. We have a saying "What goes around comes around" and I like to think it is true. If I do you a good turn you may never do me one back but will do it for someone else who does it for someone else etc and eventually it comes back to to me by a long and winding road.

Perhaps I am mean but I like to think that those who rip off others eventually get their come-uppance with added VAT!

I think this website is a "do good" area, thanks Oliver and Aleski, and for every nasty post there are dozens of nice ones. I have learn such alot from some very knowledgeable people and enjoyed the fabulous photos.

Have a good bank holiday all UK reders.

Regards

Barbara
Roma Jarvis
An act of kindness never goes un noticed. I have a friend in texas that has certainly proved what a kind heart is. This man is not rich nor crazy just kind. He met a twelve year old boy that had lst his horse. The boy said he was going to get another horse but it was 25 years old. When they walked out in the pasture one of the mares came up to the boy and he said it was love at first sight. He gave the mare to the boy as a gift no strings. I know what he paid for her as he had bought her from me. She was by an imported stallion so she was no dog. One of his rewards is ever so often he gets a picture in the mail and a report. He will always be a hero to the boy and a good man too me. Roma Any of you very breed a 4-H mare for a kid for free? Try it !!!!!
Ladypurr
Angela,

Bless you!

Anytime you show kindness and compassion for your fellow man or another creature, you are making the world a better place.

I left a local restaurant not too long ago, carrying food that I couldn't finish but planned to eat later at home.

A "man of the street" came up to me and said, "Could you spare your left-overs? I'm really hungry!" I handed them to him and thought to myself how fortunate I was to not have to practically "beg" for food.

I hear people say all the time not to give money to strangers on the streets; that they'll only turn around and use it to buy cigarettes or alcohol or worse, drugs. But, how do we know? How do we know they aren't desperate for some spare change to buy themselves a .99 burger at McDonald's?

I'm an animal rescuer and there's no way I could ever turn my back on a needy dog or cat. I spent hours working with a man last year trapping about 10 kittens of all ages that were living in a parking lot of a vacant building. Had we not captured them and spayed and neutered them later, they would have grown up to mate and create whole new litters of wild, unwanted kittens struggling desperately to survive!

I believe every act of kindness we perform touches someone and some living being in a positive, compassionate way!

--Susan wink.gif
Gari
Susan,

Always knew you were a great lady, but going to the trouble and expense of rescuing and fixing those kittens makes you a saint in my book. You are terrific!

With unbounding admiration,

Gari
Desert Tag Arabians
That was such a special story....And it is fulfilling to hear stories like your's. I've been thinking about this a lot....What is a better feeling? To help someone in need, or to encourage someone who needs it so desperately, and see their delight and joy, or to do for yourself?

More specifically....I had to ask myself, what would make me feel better? To stand holding a trophy for a great win in the ring, or to slide money into my pocket from a great sale, or to see the delight in a child's eyes who I have helped fulfill a dream? I see the ads all of the time, from these young kids "Wanted: Arabian horse for free or very little money." How many calls do they get? Probably none. Can we as breeders go around giving horses away every month? Of course not....But then look at the story we read from an earlier post about the kind man who gave the young boy a horse. Look at the story in this month's Arabian Horse Times about the very sick little girl who wished for a horse of her own and thanks to some very kind people received one.....

I think that this will be a goal for me. I hope that someday, somehow, I am in a position financially to give a child one of the greatest gifts he/she could ever receive....An Arabian horse. What gift could be more magnificent, more spiritual, more special? Especially for the child who lies in bed at night dreaming of one?

Until that time, with some thought, I hope that in the near future I can use my little farm to introduce young people to these horses. I hope that I can help bring them joy by handling the horses. And I think it would be wonderful if more farms did so. Think of the huge, beautiful farms we know....with their priceless animals...if they could share a little time every year with young people who DO NOT have money and cannot bring them any business or any financial gain, but can bring them joy from sharing something wonderful.

And, not just the children, but all people who dare to dream with little hope of ever fulfilling their dreams. A small compliment, a kind word, a shared moment....It means so much to some who so desperately need it.

I know this probably sounds pretty tacky, and perhaps I am feeling a bit "mushy" about this subject, but I just can't bear to see people give up on their dreams. A young lady who lives nearby and owns an Arabian mare visited with me and my husband this evening. She does not understand bloodlines and she's never been to a big Arabian show, but her interest was genuine, her love of the breed was genuine, and her pride in her mare was genuine. The time I spent going over her mare's pedigree with her, showing her pictures of some of its ancestors on the computer....I gave her some recent issues of the Times and several videos of historical Arabians.....She went home beaming. I also invited her to go with us to the Event. Who knows? This young girl could someday be the next big trainer? Someday she could do something extraordinary for the breed? And even if she doesn't, she's enjoyed a subject that is dear to her and learned something.

I REFUSE to believe that the world of Arabian horses, or Straight Egyptian horses, is only for the wealthy. I cannot believe it (for one, I'd have to give up my OWN dreams if I did! ohmy.gif )

Anyway, I hope we hear more encouraging stories....Best Wishes....Angela
MB Shafeena
I know EXACTLY what you mean Angela. I was zooming along the net and stopped suddently in my track to an announcement about a farm for sale here in Ontario, some of you might know Sumac Lane Arabians and was shocked to see that they were getting out of arabs and selling there place. I decided to go and look at their website and found out the reason behind, I believe, why they were selling the horses they have and the farm. And this is what I read

"Bidding Farewell to Thee IceMan
Legends Live Forever.
His dam Bint Magidaa (Khofo by Morafic x Magidaa by Alaa El Din) was descended from one of the strongest and most successful Egyptian dam lines. His sire Thee Desperado is the 1994 US Reserve National Champion.

Thee IceMan knew how to communicate clearly and expressed his indignation as passionately as his joy. He always had a special inner fire, which distinguished him from others and made him a champion.
He died April 13th, 2003 but Thee IceMan will never be forgotten
and will live on in his sons and daughters. Farewell Dear friend."

I was so shaken by these news that I sent the owners, Bill and Lynne my condolescences on their loss. I hope it helped them know that their stallion is remembered by many of us.
Guest
I think just a simple word of encouragement by e-mail of face to face, a little praise or a little advise given in the right way or a simple heres my contact details if you ever need to ask questeions feel free ,is worth a billion dollars to us newbies and not so newbies.
Ladypurr
You know another "random act of kindness" I've always extended to children is to allow them to "pet the horsey!"

Often in the past I've ridden in fairly residential areas where kids just come out of the workwork when horses appear.

I remember being so excited as a child when people on horses would appear. I'd always run up and ask if I could pet them. Many times they were just too busy to stop, or they had other reasons to ignore me.

I never forgot my disappointment when they passed me by and I vowed to never repeat that behavior when I rode my horse.

My first Arabian was a beautiful *Raffles-bred stallion. He was spirited to ride, but always kind and sweet-tempered.
One day I ran into about 15 kids at a local park and they all ran up to me and begged to pet "Buck". Not only did I stop and let them practically maul Buck (who at first was a bit uneasy, but then settled down) but I put a couple of them aboard and gave them a ride. Boy! I can still see their sweet innocent faces beaming with joy! A rather routine (but enjoyable, mind you!) ride became an opportunity to give some wonderful children a real thrill and something for them to talk about, and dream about, for a long time. Reminds me of that great old saying, "the outside of a (Arabian) horse is good for the inside of a man."

I really enjoyed being with my Arabian buddy that day!

Wanna help to bring the excitement back into owning an Arabian horse? Just take him/her out and share him/her with kids! They are our future! And these wonderful creatures are superb ambassadors for teaching kindness!

Angela, I think you've got a "good thing" goin' here!

--Susan
brendi
To all who take the time to answer e-mail and questions from "us" the new SE owner, you are so appreciated and we value your knowledge. It's amazing that I have met so many through the forums and many have been very kind and helpful and when I buy the next horse, I will remember those
smile.gif
Thanks,
Brendi
aliaalhussein
An act of kindness is ALWAYS worth it, apart from whether it is obviously appreciated or not ,or one receives feedback on it, I really DO believe that what goes around does INDEED come around, and all that aside, it makes you feel good to do something nice! There is a saying we have, I believe it is a saying of the Prophet Muhammad ,but is true in any case, that `Even a smile can be a good deed.` Sincerely, Alia
Liz Salmon
One of the most wonderful things about the breed is the fantastic people I have met from all over the world—as well as the horses of course !!. Alia, you are one of the most gracious and friendly breeders that I have had the honour to know. One of these days I would love to experience judging with you as I did with Nasr. It's so enriching having friends of all nationalities.

I was taught by my mentors to pass on knowledge, and I have been teaching now for several decades—I love it and find it very rewarding. Liz Salmon
Paul
A great thread, thank you..............and I have been the recipient of great kindness from Arabian breeders from all around the world, especially so of late. I endevour to reciprocate.
Paul
Suzanne
A few months ago, on a day when I was in a particularly bad mood! (I'm a redhead...it goes with the territory tongue.gif ) I was out in the barn and I began to hear children yelling at one of my colts in the front pasture, which is next to the road. I ignored the noise for awhile, and continued cleaning the barn. A few minutes later I heard another young voice calling to the colt and I went out to investigate. Being that I am a little protective of my horses, I'm not wild about people climbing over my first fence, to get to my second fence, to pet the horses behind the hot wire wink.gif

For those of you who aren't familiar with Canadian winters, by mid-march the snow is at about my knees and I am 5'7"! What shocked me was that there were two children who had shuffled through the snow and up to my colts field. Worried about how the yearling would react to the children yelling at him, I went out to calm him down, but found that he was quite content to walk calmly over to where the children were and stand and watch them as they yelled "Horsey, come here horsey". Their elderly grandparents watched them from the road way. I was a little miffed that they had allowed the children to climb through the rail fence and to the horse fence and I walked out to "meet" these people.
Needless to say in -20 degree weather, my mood wasn't getting any warmer!

As I neared the fence I saw that the children were no more then 6 years old, and that they had trudged through snow that was up to their chest to get as close to my colt as they could. The cold did not seem to bother them as they tried so hard to get close enough to pet the "Horsey". As cold hearted as I can sometimes be cool.gif , I could not help but see their excitement as the colt came closer to them. I began to ask them how their day was going, and brought the colt over for the scratch and pats that they had worked so hard to achieve. The looks on their faces were those of pure happiness!
The little girl had just turned 6 years old the week before (I eventually heard their whole life story!) and she proudly proclaimed to her grandparents that this was the horse she wanted to ride! She then introduced me to the shy little boy behind her. He was her little brother and it was his birthday..he was four and he really likes the grey horses (I found out). They must have stood there talking to me for 10 minutes, scratching the colt (who at this point was TOTALLY enjoying all the attention). The shy little boy became braver with each passing moment and he told me that the colt looked like "silver" and that he liked to play the lone ranger! He was going to go home and eat his Thomas the Train birthday cake and open his presents, and he was going to tell ALL his friends that he got to pet a horse today!!!

The grandparents thanked me for allowing the children to pet the horse, and as I helped them back across the fence they told me that this was "the best day ever".

I could not help but smile the whole way back to the house. My bad mood was gone, and I realized even the cold hadn't been bothering me. I learned a very valuable lesson that day and am glad that the little boy's birthday was made a little more special. It doesn't take much to make an impression in someone's life, the trick is to always be sure to make a positive one.

Okay...enough of my rambling!
Suzanne
Dennis
A great story. I'm moved. rolleyes.gif Thanks for sharing. You and your horse made two children happy. Who knows perhaps the little girl becomes the next Hansi?
aliaalhussein
Dear Liz, what an honour, thank you very much indeed! I hope we do get that chance sometime soon, Alia
Mary Denning
Hello all. I would just like to add my personal experience.

Twice last year, my stallion was to be shown by professional show handlers and for various reasons this could not happen.

Mike Ashmore stepped twice into the breach and showed Madaba for me. This was my first year showing and owning my stallion and it can be intimidating when you start out.

Mike, however, handled my boy brilliantly and got fourth at the Nationals and third at the UK Internationals.

I had meant to write a letter to Arabian Link before, just to say thanks publically to Mike, but I am glad I have had my chance here. It was MUCH appreciated at the time, and turned what could have been a miserable first experience into a positive one. I should mention that Mike would not accept payment either time.

I have also had a lot of support and friendliness from Pat and Joanna Maxwell especially, who I bought the colt from, Emma, who has been brilliant, Erik and Pip Dorssers who I went on a course with last year, the Gamlin family and most recently all at Georgian Arabians and Chris Lowe (thanks for Saturday Chris!!). I am quite happy to name names here because I think these people deserve it.

It is VERY much appreciated when you are starting out to receive help and encouragement from the pro's, and as has been said before, if we amateurs are not encouraged to get out there, then it will become far too elitist and there will be no new blood in terms of handlers coming through.

Please - to the Pro's - keep the encouragement and helpful tips coming to the amateurs, it makes for a better competition and it is remembered when someone does you a good turn and, yes, I believe what goes around comes around.

Wishing all a happy and ENJOYABLE season!!!

Mary
ema
QUOTE
perhaps I am feeling a bit "mushy" about this subject, but I just can't bear to see people give up on their dreams. A young lady who lives nearby and owns an Arabian mare visited with me and my husband this evening. She does not understand bloodlines and she's never been to a big Arabian show, but her interest was genuine, her love of the breed was genuine, and her pride in her mare was genuine. The time I spent going over her mare's pedigree with her, showing her pictures of some of its ancestors on the computer....I gave her some recent issues of the Times and several videos of historical Arabians.....She went home beaming. I also invited her to go with us to the Event.


And, Angela, who knows... for I believe some have entertained angels unaware of what they were doing... smile.gif

and on can't bear to see people giving up their dreams....ME TOO!!! For those of us who dare to dream, our dreams keep us young and alive!! We must never give up on our dreams...

If your friend comes to the Event with you, I would love to get to have some time to share with you, and maybe introduce her to "Pete"! At least we might have time to enjoy the horses and have a coke together! smile.gif

Julia
Mary Denning
Hi all. I thought I would add my personal experience here.

Last year was my first year out with my stallion, Madaba. For various reasons, at the National and the UK International the pro-handlers who were to run him could not do so.

Mike Ashmore stepped into the breach twice, showing my boy to fourth in his class at the Nationals and third at the UK Internationals. This turned what could have been a very miserable experience into a happy one. I should mention that Mike would not take payment for this.

I had meant to write to Arabian Link to say thanks publically but am glad I have had my chance here.

It is very much appreciated when you receive encouragement and advice from the pro handlers when you are starting out. I have had a lot of friendliness and encouragement from Pat and Joanna Maxwell, who I bought the colt from, Emma, who has been brilliant, Erik and Pip Dorssers who I went on a course with last year, the Gamlin family who are always friendly and approachable, most recently all at Georgian Arabians and Chris Lowe (thanks for your help Saturday, Chris!!) I am quite happy to name names here, as the encouragement has been much appreciated and the thanks deserved.

To all the pros - keep the advice and encouragement coming to the amateurs. As has been said before, it makes for better competition and it will be a boring show world if amateurs are not encouraged to get out there and have a go, and there is no new blood coming through in the handlers.

I believe what comes around DOES go around.

Best wishes to all for a happy and enjoyable season.

Mary
ema
QUOTE
"What if I got good, and sent a sketch of people's horses to them in the mail?". Or, what if I took the time to just e-mail people who put up a new website or buy a new horse and compliment them? What if I would send a card to those who post that they have lost a horse they loved? What if I would write to those young people always posting wanted ads for that beautiful Arabian and encourage them to never stop loving or believing in the breed?

I can hear all the arguments with this idea...."many might not appreciate the gesture"...."if you want to do this--fine--but don't push it on everyone else"...."I do this anyway! You just got this idea?!"....


Angela,
Again and again I see very long threads on some forums, including this one. Most of the time, after a cursory look, I pass them by.... I have no time and no use for such negativity. How can we go on and on about the problems, etc. for several hundred posts so much? How can we be so hateful in public as an industry (or horse loving group if you prefer) and then wonder why we have no market for our sale horses?

A little over a year ago, a lady I know had a SE mare and met another lady thru the Discovery Farm program.... and the second lady, lets call her Martha, fell in love with this mare... The mare had some age on her, would ride, but was rather stand-offish in her feelings toward people... I mean, people we ok and she appreciated friendly, good treatment... but she did not seem a mare who would want to "bond" with her people...
Well, she took to Martha like a duck to water!! Riding, grooming, just visiting... the horse lit up when she saw Martha coming.
Now, Martha was a middle aged lady, a wonderful lady with a life-long love of horses... but raising children and caring for family and other things kept her out of the horse world, EXCEPT in her dreams... so when she and this horse clicked it was really something to see...

Long story short, owner gave the mare to Martha...and both Martha and the mare live in that "happily ever after" state that we think only happen in fairy tales!

So, folks, you never know how far the positive stuff will take us... Let's turn things around and begin to see the positive, learning, helpful posts reach hundreds, and kill the critical, name-calling, back-biting threads with kindness (and refusal to post in them if we have to!)

Julia
Jolanda
My brother is blind, not from birth on but after a severe car accident many years ago. Together with our parents we visited the Egyptian Event in Ludwigsburg in Germany. It was long time ago in 1987! We were children then and I loved horses like every girl. My little brother was very shy and uncertain because the accident wasn't long ago and the world for him had nothing good in store. He had changed from an ever-smiling and ever-talking pain in the arse into a shy and introverted person. Our parents and we went through the tents and passed several stables. Then a friendly girl asked if we children would like to see a special stallion. He was a beautiful chestnut but sadly I can't remember his name. We were allowed to go into his box and to scratch and pat him. All I know today is that he was warm and tender and very calm and friendly. Then the lady realized my brother couldn't see anything and asked him if he wish to get in closer contact to the horse. My brother whispered a shy "Yes". I left the stable and the horse, my brother and the lady were alone. Then my brother had the opportunity to experience a living horse with his fingertips. He scratched his legs, his belly and the big red stallion came down with his head and my brother, who looked like a dwarf against this horse gave him a big hug. To make it short this horses and this girl made my depressive brother really happy and from then on he had only one wish: "Give me a horse!" My parents couldn't afford a riding horse but we managed to get a Pony for me and him and he got special riding lessons and it worked out fine. He had many battles to fight but until this day he has a horse. And guess what? He has an Arabian. If it was not for this girl who so kindly showed me and my brother the horse and installed the love to horses in him who knows...? For her it was just some minutes, for my brother it was a huge experience. Thank you girl wherever you may be. It was a true act of kindness.
Cin
Here is a 'random act of kindness' that just happened this weekend tongue.gif

A newcomer - 14 girl old girl who had just gotten a Half-Arab and was showing Class A for the first time- had ridden in her classes, not placing well, but very, very happy to be part of the 'gang.' While admiring all the native costumes (we had 4 go in the Native Costume class), the mother of one of the costume riders asked the young girl if she'd like to try going in the class the next day.

They went to the office and switched riders, and that next day the young girl, for the first time in her life, rode Native Costume at a Class A show. She was so excited she went around hugging everyone!!! I told the woman that she had made, not only the girl's weekend, but probably her whole month! biggrin.gif
Guest
This is really aimed at EMA...


QUOTE
Again and again I see very long threads on some forums, including this one. Most of the time, after a cursory look, I pass them by.... I have no time and no use for such negativity. How can we go on and on about the problems, etc. for several hundred posts so much?



Truth or fiction, positive or negative, agree or disagree, right or wrong...it is not important how we feel about someone's opinion...it has nothing to do with us...the fact of the matter is, that even if what somebody says is completely wrong, that is how this person feels and they have gone out on a limb to share it with people, they believe might understand. In life, we get two chances: to turn off people because we don't like what they have to say OR to make a difference in someone else's life. I hope that we always choose the second and not be so prompt to dismiss anothre person because we don't like what they have to say. What does that say about us then?
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